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Commercial Salmon Advisory Board and Area Harvest Committee Terms of Reference

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Table of Contents

1. Commercial Salmon Advisory Board (CSAB)
1.1. Mandate
1.2. Guiding Principles
1.3. Structure
1.4. Membership
1.5. Roles and Responsibilities
1.6. Procedures
1.7. Board/Committee Charter
2. Salmon Area Harvest Committees (AHC)
2.1. Mandate
2.2. Guiding Principles
2.3. Structure
2.4. Membership
2.5. Roles and Responsibilities
2.6. Procedures
2.7. Board/Committee Charter
Appendix 1 Commercial Salmon Advisory Board Directors
Appendix 2 Committee Charter

1. Commercial Salmon Advisory Board (CSAB):

1.1. Mandate

  • Provides advice on policy matters related to the commercial salmon fishery.
  • Develops Commercial salmon harvest plans that consolidate and co-ordinate the interests of the various areas and gear types, according to the objective and criteria developed by the Integrated Salmon Harvest Planning Committee.
  • For example, provide recommendations to resolve conflicting issues within the commercial sector allocation, harvesting priorities and responses to SARA concerns (as they pertain to impacts on salmon fisheries).
  • Serve as the consultative body on issues that affect commercial salmon fisheries.

1.2. Guiding Principles

Transparent:

There must be transparency throughout the process based on open lines of communication and the provision of timely, accurate, accessible, clear and objective information. This information must be available to all participants in the process. Organizers must provide access to agendas and information needed as a starting point for informed discussion well in advance of meetings. In addition, this information will be posted to a public website to ensure accountability to all Canadians.

Accountable:

Participants who are representatives of a constituency are expected to bring to the discussions the general views, knowledge and experience of those they represent, and bring back an awareness and understanding to their constituencies about deliberations of the consultation activity and reasons for decisions taken. All participants share accountability for the success of the process. The Department is accountable to participants for explaining how their advice/input was used and why and how decisions are taken.

Balanced Representation:

Representation on commercial advisory committees should relate to the mandate and function of the CSAB. Participation in advisory processes should be fairly balanced and reflect a broad range of interests in fisheries and oceans issues in the Pacific Region, to the extent possible, so that a diversity of perspectives is involved.

Effective & Efficient:

All participants should be satisfied that the process can achieve the goals of the mandate. This does not mean that participants will always agree with the final advice, outcome or recommendation. Processes must be cost-effective, and set and reflect realistic timeframes.

1.3. Structure

  • There will be one main board, the CSAB with two subcommittees (North and South)
  • An independent chair will be chosen through an open process.
  • The CSAB will meet at least two times per year; once in the spring (early April) to review the Allocation Implementation Plan and once per year or as needed to discuss overriding policy implementation.
  • The North and South Coast Subcommittees will meet as needed.
  • Up to the discretion of the CSAB to name "in-camera" meetings.

1.4. Membership

  • Two elected members from each of the eight Area Harvest Committees (AHC) and two representatives each from the UFAWU, the Native Brotherhood of B.C. and the Processing Industry will sit on the CSAB.
  • AHC alternates should also be elected to serve in the capacity of their primary Board members during their absence at meetings. The UFAWU, The Native Brotherhood of BC and the Processing Industry will appoint their alternates.
  • The North and South Coast Subcommittees will consist of two representatives from each of the AHC's in that area (i.e. North - Area A, C and F; South - Area B,D,E,G and H) and one representative each from the UFAWU, the Native Brotherhood of B.C. and the Processing Industry.

Note: There should be ex-officio representation from the Province on the CSAB.

1.5. Roles and Responsibilities

DFO:

  • DFO will provide fisheries management and technical expertise, as agreed to by both parties, to support CSAB meetings.
  • The Department should refer stakeholders and other outside parties who offer unsolicited recommendations and advice outside of the established process to the appropriate advisory body contact.

AHC:

  • AHC's that are established in each licensing area will serve as advisory committees to the CSAB, through their elected representatives.

CSAB Secretariat:

  • May establish a secretariat to support CSAB administration.
  • The CSAB secretariat is responsible for development of the meeting agenda and notification of CSAB members. The DFO will be invited to add to the agenda.
  • The CSAB secretariat is also responsible for recording a Summary Record of minutes, actions points that arise from the meeting and distribution of the minutes to relevant CSAB members and DFO staff.

CSAB:

  • Nominated representatives from the membership of the CSAB to sit on the DFO Integrated Harvest Planning Committee.
  • Provide information to and communicate with respective AHC members as required, to keep them informed of CSAB activities or decisions.
  • Develop decision guidelines for in-season management action in the commercial sector.
  • Develop measures and mechanisms for timely and accurate data collection or monitoring as required by the Department.
  • Provide advice on enforcement objectives and issues.
  • Provide advice on principles and guidelines for the commercial harvesting component for any new or emerging stock assessment programs.
  • Provide advice on improved selective fishing practices.
  • Provide in-season advice and recommendations on fishing related issues to the Department as appropriate.
  • Provide advice on other commercial sector issues as required.
  • Develop sub-committees as appropriate to deal with specific issues, tasks, projects or assignments that may arise in the course of ensuring that commercial fishing interests are being well represented.
  • Meet with Sport Fish Advisory Board (SFAB), First Nations representatives or other interested parties as appropriate to resolve issues between the sectors.
  • Develops or acquires scientific expertise necessary to adequately represent the commercial sector in dealing with issues like endangered species, reduced harvest rates on particular stocks, departmental spawning ground initiatives, etc.
  • Participate in other industry organizations and activities, as well as broader DFO consultation processes, as required.
  • Support the development of a funding mechanism.
  • Ensure AHC's are operating in a manner consistent with the principles laid out in section 2.2.
  • Provide nominees for Ministerial appointments.

1.6. Procedures

  • Decisions taken or advice provided by this Board will be developed on the basis of consensus1. Where consensus is not possible the Chairman will summarize the differing views and advise the Department accordingly, and the CSAB will develop a dispute resolution mechanism, as required.
  • The CSAB Chair will provide time in the agendas for formal presentations from interested parties. The Chair may require a written submission prior to the personal presentation, in the interest of understanding the issue and dealing with it in a timely manner.
  • The Chair will ensure that the Committee Charter is adhered to.
  • Upon approval of the Directors the Board may obtain professional advice to further the interests of the commercial industry.

1Consensus is a process for making decisions. Its main feature is that no action is taken unless all members of the group can support the action, or agree not to obstruct it. Consensus does not require that everyone be in complete agreement, but only that all will be willing to accept - consent to - a decision.

1.7. Board/Committee Charter

(See Appendix 2)

2. Salmon Area Harvest Committees (AHC):

2.1. Mandate

Each of the AHC's develops specific salmon harvesting plans relative to the area and gear type for consolidation and co-ordination by the CSAB; and provides advice to the CSAB on all matters related to the Board's mandate, for example, management, enforcement and allocation.

2.2. Guiding Principles

Transparent:

There must be transparency throughout the process based on open lines of communication and the provision of timely, accurate, accessible, clear and objective information. This information must be available to all participants in the process. Organizers must provide access to agendas and information needed as a starting point for informed discussion well in advance of meetings.

Accountable:

Participants who are representatives of a constituency are expected to bring to the discussion the general views, knowledge and experience of those they represent, and bring back an awareness and understanding to their constituencies about deliberations of the consultation activity and reasons for decisions taken. All participants share accountability for the success of the process. The Department is accountable to participants for explaining how their advice/input was used and why and how decisions are taken.

Balanced Representation:

Representation on commercial advisory committees should relate to the mandate and function of the Area Harvesting Committee. Participation in advisory processes should be fairly balanced and reflect a broad range of interests in fisheries and oceans issues in the Pacific Region, to the extent possible, so that a diversity of perspectives is involved.

Effective & Efficient:

All participants should be satisfied that the process can achieve the goals of the mandate. This does not mean that participants will always agree with the final advice, outcome or recommendation. Processes must be cost-effective, and set and respect realistic timeframes.

2.3. Structure

  • All meetings will be conducted generally adhering to Robert's Rules of order.
  • Elections will normally be held every year where half the board will be up for re-election. The current terms will be extended until after area re-selection. New Boards, in time for the planning process of 2006, must be elected.
  • Elections should be held through the past practice of conducting nominations and elections through registered mail-outs to all licence holders unless otherwise agreed.
  • The contact owner for a vessel that permanently hold a category A, or reduced fee category A, salmon licence eligibility/ies or the licence eligibility holder for a category F or N salmon licence are considered eligible to nominate/vote. One vote per licence.
  • Chair will be chosen from the elected board and will be elected at the first meeting following Board elections.
  • Each of the eight licence areas will have an AHC.

2.4. Membership

  • According to the voting structure described above.
  • Membership will be structured to ensure that the principles in Section 2.2. are met.

Current state:
Area A, B, D, E and H Committee, 12 representatives each
Area C Committee, 8 representatives
Area F Committee, 10 representatives
Area G Committee, 9 representatives

2.5. Roles & Responsibilities

DFO:

  • Fishery managers to meet with AHC's as needed to review information discuss fishing options and implement fisheries.
  • Develop collaborative arrangements with AHC's.

AHC:

  • Responsible for representing the interests of the specific area and gear type to the CSAB through two elected representatives.
  • Provides advice to the CSAB on all matters relative to the Boards mandate.
  • Develops specific harvesting plans including fishery time frame, starting dates, and boundaries for individual fisheries relative to the area and gear type for consolidation and co-ordination by the CSAB.
  • Develops recommendations to the CSAB for appropriate co-ordination of monitoring and data collection programs.
  • Identify problems encountered regarding the management or enforcement of the fishery.
  • Meet with SFAB, First Nations representatives or other interested parties as appropriate to resolve issues affecting the respective sectors or area gear types.
  • Provide in-season advice on fishing related matters to DFO as appropriate to the area and gear type.
  • Develop sub-committees as appropriate to deal with specific issues.
  • Provide information to and communicate with fishermen and area licence holders, as required, to keep them informed of AHC activities or decisions.
  • Attend and review pre-season forecast and post-season stock status meetings.
  • Provide nominees for Ministerial appointments to the CSAB.

2.6. Procedures

  • Decisions of the AHC will be by simple majority of the Board of Directors, with the provision of a minority report when necessary.
  • The Chair will provide time in the agenda for formal presentation from interested parties in the area that are not represented on the Committee. The Committee may require a written submission prior to the personal presentation, in the interest of understanding the issues and dealing with it in a timely manner.
  • Meetings will be called by the Board, as required to deal with the interests of the licensed fishermen.
  • It will be up to the discretion of the AHC to name "in-camera" meetings.
  • If the AHC's implement a secretariat structure that is separate to the CSAB, the AHC secretariat will provide motions and recommendations of each of the AHC meetings.
  • Funding for the operation of the AHC will be determined at a later date.
  • Individual AHC's may undertake additional responsibilities or activities as necessary to represent their individual licence area interests. However if this ancillary activity impacts or involves license fishermen from outside of their area it must be discussed within the CSAB process.

2.7. Board/Committee Charter

(see Appendix 2)

Appendix 1 - Commercial Salmon Advisory Board Directors

Area A:
Directors  Rick Haugan and Chris Cue
Alternates  Bill Wilson and Bill Forbes
Area B:
Directors Chris Ashton and Gord Wasden
Alternates Bob Rezansoff and Don Assu
Area C:
Directors Joy Thorkelson and Mabel Mazurek
Alternates Don Roberts and Kim Olsen
Area D:
Directors Les Rombough and Mac Matheson
Alternates Paul Kershaw and Ryan McEachern
Area E:
Directors Ken Connolly and Len Koyanagi
Alternates Rick Bailey, Don Carter, Mike Forrest, Tom Sheaves, Richard Nomura, Steve Wilsom, Bruce Probert, Paul Kershaw, Bob McKamey and Terry Lubzinski
Area F:
Directors Terry Gustafson and Bill DeGreef
Alternates Sverre Haukness and Lawrence Paulsen
Area G:
Directors Andy Amos and Peter Sakich
Alternates Peter DeGreef and Tim Noot
Area H:
Directors Rick Nordstrom and Mike Griswold
Alternates John Hughes and Tom Kasmer
 
  NBBC: Bill Duncan and Chris Cook
  UFAWU: Garth Minrau and Glenn Arkko
  Processors: Rob Morley and Greg Taylor

Appendix 2 - Committee Charter

Provided to Fisheries and Oceans Canada by
Institute for Dispute Resolution, University of Victoria
Review of Improved Decision-Making

The purpose of a Committee Charter is to promote productive discussion and provide a positive and supportive environment for that discussion. The Charter defines the expectations members have for themselves and each other regarding how they will work together.

The charter below is meant to be a starting point for discussion. Ground rules need to be developed and agreed upon jointly by the group and must be reviewed regularly. As new participants become involved with the committee, they should familiarize themselves with the charter.

  • Charter should include:
    • Clarifying objectives of the meeting
    • How the information will be used

Individuals' rights to participate in consultation processes are accompanied by responsibilities. Parties that participate in consultation processes should do so in good faith. Participants also have a responsibility to engage in effective, balanced and civil communication. All representatives have a responsibility to ensure that they are accountable to their constituents, that the government gets the information it needs to make a well-informed and balance decisions, and that consultation processes operate as efficiently as possible.

Participants in consultation processes should:

  1. Maximize the exchange of information among parties and minimize misunderstandings by:
    • speaking clearly, listening carefully and asking for clarification if a point is not understood;
    • sharing information related to the issues at hand;
    • stating concerns what is important to them and why;
    • stating their perspective as concisely and briefly as possible; and
    • ensuring proper opportunity to clarify the agenda prior to the commencement of meetings.
  2. Ensure that all participants have the opportunity to speak and all perspectives are taken into account by:
    • seeking the participation of all interests; and
    • providing opportunities for affected parties to be heard before making a decision
  3. Maintain a respectful atmosphere by:
    • respecting each others' values and interests;
    • avoiding accusatory language, rude behaviour and stereotyping;
    • listening to what others have to say without interrupting;
    • beginning a meeting on time;
    • seeking a better understanding of other perspectives with an open mind; and
    • leave personal views on a particular issue "at the door".
  4. Ensure accountability to constituencies by:
    • making every effort to attend all important consultation meetings, or sending an alternate as agreed upon by constituents;
    • establishing clear lines of accountability with those they represent, and with other representatives;
    • acting in accordance with the authority granted by constituents and ensuring that other representatives understand this authority;
    • communicating pertinent information to their constituencies regularly and seeking support for negotiated agreements;
    • acting quickly to raise and resolve any concerns regarding the accountability of the process or any of the representatives to protect the integrity and trust of the group.
  5. When negotiating in a consultation process, facilitate agreements across the full spectrum of interests by:
    • negotiating in good faith, building as much agreement as possible;
    • avoiding participation in activities that may undermine the negotiation;
    • focusing on underlying interests or objectives rather than positions and seek to understand the interests of others;
    • recognizing the legitimacy of all interests;
    • treating issues as problems to be solved not as personal or sectoral conflicts;
    • allowing representatives the freedom to test ideas without prejudice to future discussion or negotiations - do not hold tentative suggestions or agreements against those who made them; and
    • seeking creative solutions that accommodate all interests; and
    • positively supporting consensus agreements once they have been reached.
  6. Engaging in appropriate external communication by:
    • ensuring that descriptions of the process and the views of other representatives are accurate and acceptable to all representatives before communicating them to the general public or the media;
    • ensuring that contact with the media is respectful of others.