Lesson Plan - Fisheries Careers for First Nations - British Columbia

Material available and resources required

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Prescribed learning outcomes and curriculum organizers

Planning 10

Personal interests and attributes:

  • relate personal attributes and interests to education and career planning

Labour market information:

  • relate labour market information (e.g., types of employment, required skills and education, salary range) to careers of interest

Support networks and resources:

  • identify support networks and resources (e.g., family, school, and community resources) for pursuing their education and career goals

Transition plan:

  • organize information or ideas they have read, heard or viewed in the form of simple charts, webs, or illustration

Course requirements, exams, and focus areas:

  • identify the course requirements for the Graduation Program
  • identify ways of earning credits for the Graduation Program (e.g., in-school courses, external credits)

Support may be available

Contact your local Stream to Sea Education Coordinator or Community Advisor or phone 604-666-6614 to find out if an Education Coordinator in your area assists with this activity.

An exploration of traditional and modern fisheries stewardship, related careers and how to direct a career path toward these jobs.

Lesson overview

This lesson helps students explore the full spectrum of fish- and fishery-related jobs that are important to the economies of many First Nations communities. Traditional and modern stewardship practices that lead to careers are viewed through several short, real case studies. Students will examine their skills and interests to help them find potential matches with a fisheries career. [Internet recommended].

Estimate of time required

Overview of materials and resources required

Other required material

Recommended additional resources and optional enrichment activities

(E.g. Web-sites, Teaching Guides, Student Reading, Videos/Audio-tapes, Posters and Brochures, Field Trips)

Activity description

Length: 90 minutes [Internet research may be conducted as homework if a computer lab is not available].

Overview

Materials

Lesson outcomes

At the end of the lesson, students should be able to:

Lesson plan and time required

1. Introduce the lesson: 5 minutes

2. Case study: First Nations Fisheries Stewardship : 15 minutes

3. Case study: First Nations fisheries jobs : 15 minutes

4. Case study: Introducing careers in fisheries and stewardship : 15 minutes

5. Self-assessment of interests: 15 minutes

6. Exploring fisheries and stewardship careers: 15 minutes or homework

7. Wrap up/the next step: 10 minutes

Enrichment activity: Cooperative fishing and the tragedy of the Commons

Copyright © 2005 Jeff Fletcher (UBC Let's Talk Science Partnership Program)

This game is used to encourage students to think about the roles of fisheries management, enforcement and stewardship in protecting the common good.

Cooperative fishing and the tragedy of the Commons

1. Learning objectives:

2. Materials:

3. How to perform the experiment:

4. Explanation of what's happening:

5. References (if applicable):

Student handouts

Material available and resources required

Student Handouts in PDF format

Case study: Russel Barsh

Excerpted from: "Traditional Ecological Knowledge and its modern application in the context of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs)", Russel Barsh, Center for the Study of Coast Salish Environments, Washington.

"I used to work for the Míkmaq Grand Council in Atlantic Canada, where of course, there aren't many fish anymore. We watched all of that happen, and one of the problems was that no one was listening to local people. I now work for a little tribally sponsored research center - the Center for the Study of Coastal Salish Environments, established by the Samish Nation. We examine how First Nations people transformed the landscape, how people took care of things. Our main mandate is science in the service of stewardship of the Samish traditional territory. Part of that is combining traditional knowledge with conventional Western science. We work a lot on salmon, rockfish, native oysters and recruiting and training young native scientists into our Samish Stewards program. I work with them to figure out what kind of research to do and we go out together and do it. We don't have a bunch of people sitting in offices; we have young tribal members doing field research and bringing in university experts and their graduate students along to help figure out how to do it best. The Samish leadership has come to the conclusion that there's not much of a future in fishing, but rather in becoming scientists, engineers, teachers, becoming fishers of technology and scientists of fish. We like fish, we eat our science, we only work on species we like to eat. We feel that the people who will have the greatest power and wealth in the San Juan Islands are those who know about fish, make decisions about fish, and who know how to make fish thrive, rather than just those who catch fish. We're seen as having an economic development focus, even though what we do is not development at all. We train scientists.

"We're involved right now in three Marine Protected Area projects. The most interesting is the establishment of a "marine stewardship area" for all of San Juan County, which is the entire San Juan archipelago. This project was announced last month by the San Juan Board of County Commissioners. We had our tribal council in the commissioners' chamber with them and it was a joint declaration of the Samish Nation and San Juan County. They passed a resolution declaring the marine stewardship area, and we passed a resolution endorsing it and saying, "we'll work with you and make it a partnership". This is just an idea so far, a framework. There are no rules and regulations at this point. It's a commitment to see that living resources in San Juan County are given the best protection possible so that they will always be there. It's the first step in establishing co-management over a very large habitat area. We worked on the research to support this effort by looking at which habitats and species were at risk in the San Juan Islands, but more importantly, working with non-native communities in the San Juan Islands to get them to see the connection between their concerns and our concerns, organizing a base of mutual interest in building a kind of Marine Protected Area that both native and non-native communities wanted. This is different than having some area declared a park, and asking First Nations later if they agree. Or sometimes it goes the other way around: tribes take action on fishing regulations and quotas under their treaty rights and then wait to see if everyone else will agree. That usually ends up with everyone going to court and fish not being protected.

"The Cypress Island Aquatic Reserve is an extremely special place to the Samish people both as a fishing ground (especially halibut, which has been a source of wealth for a very long time), and as a sacred place. The mountains of the island are power places and very, very important spiritually, including places where the Thunderbirds nest. The Thunderbirds control the weather, so these places have huge power, and have to be treated with enormous respect. The State of Washington thought this would make a great park, but we intervened and insisted that they look at it our way and examine what is there to protect, and work with us. We decided to be proactive. Instead of waiting for a proposal from the government about how to set up the aquatic reserve, we designed it and went to them. We presented management regulations, critical areas, cultural landscapes, surveys, fish and wildlife inventories, and the state adopted it. It's a unique arrangement: there's recreational use, but no commercial use; there's subsistence and cultural use; there are places the public can't go because they are spiritual places.

"There is a proposal for a network of marine state parks in the San Juans (state owned park lands with a proposed extension to the marine environment). We chose to work with the state parks department because they have a cultural and interpretive mandate, and we could say we also want to protect these marine areas so people can understand the value of the sea to the Samish. It's not just about fish, it's about how Samish people take care of fish, and raising awareness about how Samish people have always been part of the ecosystem, managing and protecting it. Instead of saying "take the people out to protect the fish," we turn that around and say "people are good for fish if they know what they're doing." We can take the pressure off the fish and teach people how to take care of things.

"This is another way we are trying to assert ownership over areas of concern in the Samish traditional territory. This is a way of giving Samish people more presence, more influence, more enjoyment of the resources of the area by taking the initiative, rather than being reactive when things are being done-- saying "WAIT a minute that's a VIOLATION of treaty rights!", and wasting our resources fighting about it afterwards. Instead we have the state government saying "That's a great idea and we have some money for research. We would like you to make some maps, establish a ranger program," and so on. That way of thinking goes back to Samish ideas of wealth and power from the past, and to traditional values of stewardship. MPAs are actually old ideas. Instead of talking just about no-take zones we're talking about traditional notions of family ownership of fishing areas. There was always someone responsible for any place that had value. There were areas that were so precious that they really were no-take areas. "This is another way we are trying to assert ownership over areas of concern in the Samish traditional territory. This is a way of giving Samish people more presence, more influence, more enjoyment of the resources of the area by taking the initiative, rather than being reactive when things are being done-- saying "WAIT a minute that's a VIOLATION of treaty rights!", and wasting our resources fighting about it afterwards. Instead we have the state government saying "That's a great idea and we have some money for research. We would like you to make some maps, establish a ranger program," and so on. That way of thinking goes back to Samish ideas of wealth and power from the past, and to traditional values of stewardship. MPAs are actually old ideas. Instead of talking just about no-take zones we're talking about traditional notions of family ownership of fishing areas. There was always someone responsible for any place that had value. There were areas that were so precious that they really were no-take areas.

Fish-related careers in British Columbia

Canadian labour market information

These career titles come from http://www.labourmarketinformation.ca. To see detailed job descriptions, click "Job Descriptions" and search for "fish". Numbers are the NOC (National Occupational Classification) Code.

Management occupations

Natural and applied sciences and related occupations

Occupations in social science, education, government service and religion

Occupations in art, culture, recreation and sport

Sales and service occupations

Occupations unique to primary industry

Occupations unique to processing, manufacturing and utilities

Pathfinder Survey
Name:
Part 1 : Interests and Skills:
Select the interests and skills that apply to you. For each selection, provide an example of how you have demonstrated the interest or skill.
My Interests: My Examples:
Being outdoors
Computers
Enforcing rules
Fixing/repairing things
Helping/teaching others
Inventing/designing things
Lab experiments
Leadership
Organizing things
Physical activity
Plants and animals
Reading and writing
Researching
Solving problems
Traveling
Working with my hands  
Working with others
5.4:  Grade 9-12: Finding an Environmental Career Path

Internet resources: Researching careers

Career Description Databases


First Nations Fisheries Careers and Stewardship

Examples of Specific Fisheries and Stewardship Careers

Fisheries and Stewardship Courses

Lesson Plan Written by Patrick Walshe, edited by Elizabeth Leboe