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2007

 

 

Information Document to Assist Development of a

 

Fraser Chinook

Management Plan

 

 

 


 


RECORD OF REVISIONS

 

Plan:   2007 Fraser River Chinook Information Document

 

Date last revised:      Wednesday, February 21, 2007

 

Version Number:        2 (this number will change if amendments are issued in-season)

 

 

#

Date

Page

Subject

Revision Details

Contact

E

Feb. 21

38

Recreational Catch

Figure Corrected.

 

E

Feb. 21

43

Recreational Catch

Mabel Lake corrected

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES:


Table of Contents

 

Table of Appendices. 4

List of Tables. 4

1.         Introduction.. 5

2.         Lifecycle.. 5

3.         General Context.. 6

3.1.       Policy Framework for the Management of Pacific Salmon Fisheries. 6

3.2.       Pacific Salmon Treaty (PST). 7

3.3.       Special Concerns for 2007. 8

4.         Management Objectives. 10

4.1.       Conservation.. 10

4.2.       Aboriginal fisheries for food, social and ceremonial purposes. 10

4.3.       International Allocation.. 10

4.4.       Domestic Allocations. 10

5.         Stock Assessment.. 11

5.1.       Management Units. 11

5.2.       Lower Fraser River Stocks. 12

5.3.       Interior Fraser River Stocks. 13

5.4.       Stock Assessment Methods. 13

5.5.       Forecasts. 14

5.6.       Escapement Objectives. 14

5.7.       Albion Test Fishery.. 14

6.         Enhancement.. 15

6.1.       Chilliwack River Hatchery.. 15

6.2.       Chehalis Hatchery.. 16

6.3.       Birkenhead Hatchery.. 16

6.4.       Interior Fraser Chinook Enhancement. 16

7.         First Nations Fisheries. 16

7.1.       2006 Fishery Summary.. 16

7.2.       Catch Monitoring.. 17

7.3.       2007 Fishing Plan.. 19

8.         Recreational Fisheries. 19

8.1.       Fishery Summary.. 19

8.2.       Catch Monitoring.. 20

8.3.       2007 Fishing Plan.. 21

9.         Commercial.. 21

9.1.       Overall Commercial Fishery Summary.. 21

9.2.       Catch Monitoring.. 22

9.3.       Area E Gillnet – Fraser River.. 22

9.4.       Area G Troll – West Coast of Vancouver Island.. 23

9.5.       Area F Troll – North Coast. 24

 

Table of Appendices

 

Appendix A: Albion Test Fishery.. 25

Appendix B: Chinook escapement estimates to tributaries in the lower Fraser River.. 26

Appendix C: 1993-2006 Chinook escapement estimates to tributaries in the BC Interior.. 27

Appendix D: CTC Indicator Stocks. 31

Appendix E: Fraser River First Nations Fishing Times and Catch by Area.. 31

Appendix F: 2006 Recreational Catch Data.. 31

Appendix G: Draft 2007 Chinook Recreational Fishing Plans. 31

Appendix H: 2006 Commercial Catches and Summary of 2004 Area H Sampling Program... 31

Appendix i: Salmon Endowment Fund.. 31

Appendix j: Additional Technical Information.. 31

Appendix k: DFO Contacts. 31

 

 

 

List of Tables

 

Table 1:  Interim Management Units for Fraser River Chinook salmon....... 11

 


1.             Introduction

Fraser River Chinook salmon are an important part of the ecology of the Fraser River watershed.  They are the largest of the seven species of Pacific salmon (including steelhead and anadromous cutthroat) returning to the Fraser and have the widest distribution, with some stocks migrating distances over 900 km from the mouth to systems near the headwaters of the Fraser.  They have sustained First Nations for thousands of years, provide important recreational harvesting opportunities, and were an important part of the colonization of British Columbia and commercialization of the British Columbia fishing industry.

This information document is intended to compliment the Southern BC Integrated Fisheries Management Plans for salmon.  This document is necessary as Chinook fisheries in the Lower Fraser area generally start in March, the estimate of aggregate abundance used to determine allowable harvest levels for Chinook is also available in March but the Integrated Fishery Management Plans are usually not finalized until May or June of a given year.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada will continue to consult with First Nations, recreational and commercial fishers to further co-ordinate Chinook fishing plans for 2007.  Further consultation will occur as sector specific plans are finalized.

2.             Lifecycle

There are several distinctly different life histories exhibited by Fraser River Chinook salmon. Chinook salmon spawn in numerous tributary systems throughout the Fraser watershed from just above the tidal limits to the upper tributaries of the Stuart drainage and Tete Jaune Cache near Mount Robson.  Fry emerge from the gravel in the spring following spawning and then, depending on their freshwater rearing pattern, may migrate immediately to the estuary (e.g. Harrison), spend between 60 to 150 days in freshwater (e.g. Maria Slough and Lower Shuswap) or may spend up to a year between their natal system and downstream rearing areas before their migration to the coast.

 

The smolts adapt to salt water in the Fraser River estuary before migrating into marine waters.  While the majority of lower Fraser stocks rear off the south-west coast of Vancouver Island (Harrison and Chilliwack fall stocks), coded wire tag (CWT) information has shown that other stocks may be found over a wide geographic area with many spring and summer run populations utilizing offshore marine waters, while others migrate and reside at least as far north as Southeast Alaska.  During their ocean residence and depending on their ocean rearing location and return migrations, they may be subject to numerous fisheries.  Offshore migrants such as the Interior spring and summer yearlings are less vulnerable to coastal fisheries than Lower Fraser fall stocks and the South Thompson summer stocks.

 

After one to three years spent feeding at sea, Chinook return to the Fraser River from February to November, primarily as three, four and five year old fish.  They migrate back to their natal streams where spawning activity commences from early August until mid-November depending on the system.  The following spring the fry of these returning fish emerge from the gravel and the lifecycle begins anew.

3.             General Context

3.1.          Policy Framework for the Management of Pacific Salmon Fisheries

Salmon management programs in 2007 will continue to be guided by policy and operational initiatives adopted over the past several years.  These include; Canada’s Policy for Conservation of Wild Pacific Salmon (WSP), An Allocation Policy for Pacific Salmon, A Policy for Selective Fishing, A Framework for Improved Decision Making in the Pacific Salmon Fishery, and Fishery Monitoring and Catch Reporting Framework.

 

The WSP, which was approved in 2005, sets out a process for the protection, preservation and rebuilding of wild salmon and their marine and freshwater ecosystems for the benefit of all Canadians.  The policy provides for the identification of genetically discrete groupings of stocks (called “Conservation Units”) and the identification of upper and lower abundance benchmarks that are a measure of the status of each of these stock groupings. 

 

A Conservation Unit is defined as a group of wild salmon that is sufficiently isolated from other groups that, if lost, is very unlikely to re-colonize naturally within an acceptable timeframe (e.g. a human lifetime or a specified number of salmon generations).  A PSARC working paper describing the conservation units and the methods used to determine which salmon fit into a conservation unit is anticipated in late spring, 2007.

 

Other features of the WSP include the monitoring of habitat status and a process for public engagement in the establishment of upper abundance benchmarks that reflect social and economic values.

 

An Allocation Policy for Pacific Salmon, announced in 1999, is a significant step towards providing certainty and fairness by establishing clear priorities for allocation between fishing sectors and within the commercial fishery gear types.

 

In January 2001, the Department released A Policy for Selective Fishing in Canada’s Pacific Fisheries.  Under the Department’s selective fishing initiative, harvester groups have experimented with a variety of methods to reduce the impact of fisheries on non-target species, with a number of measures reaching implementation in fisheries.

 

Consultative elements of an Improved Decision Making discussion paper have been implemented through establishment of the Consultation Secretariat, which works to improve the flow of information between stakeholders and the Department.  Up-to-date information pertaining to on-going consultations can be found on the Secretariat’s website at:www-comm.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/pages/consultations/consult_e.htm.

 

A discussion paper outlining the potential approaches for commercial salmon fisheries to address the objectives set out in the Fishery Monitoring and Catch Reporting Framework were released for consultation in the fall of 2003.  Monitoring programs will continue in 2007 to assess harvests (both target and non-target species) as well as other non-harvest mortalities.

 

In April 2005, the Department announced a blueprint for fundamental reform of Pacific Fisheries. This was in response to recognition of conservation concerns, very poor economic returns in the salmon fishery, and recommendations included in reports from the Joint Task Group (Drs P. Pearse and J. McRae) and the First Nations Panel (FNP). Both the JTG and FNP reports call for improved co-management and a clear process based on voluntary licence retirement for re-allocating fish stocks to First Nations. Both reports also call for a revised approach to the management of salmon to begin as soon as possible. The reports also make a number of other recommendations which are intended to improve the environmental and economic performance of the fishery.

3.2.          Pacific Salmon Treaty (PST)

In March 1985, the United States and Canada agreed to co-operate in the management, research and enhancement of Pacific salmon stocks of mutual concern by ratifying the Pacific Salmon Treaty (PST).  Under the Treaty, Canada and the United States agreed on a Chinook conservation program (based on fixed catch ceilings in certain major mixed-stock ocean fisheries) to rebuild stocks from both countries by 1998.  This strategy has met with mixed success; some populations are slowly rebuilding, while others remain depressed.

 

Starting in 1985, Canada based its Chinook fisheries management on a rebuilding strategy.  Total exploitation rates on a brood year were reduced from past high levels in the range of 75% - 85%.  The minimum requirement of the Pacific Salmon Treaty (1985) was a 15% reduction in total exploitation of the four indicator stocks identified at that time.  This was in addition to domestic measures already in place, such as the closure of the terminal Fraser River commercial gillnet fishery, and measures required in pass-through fisheries to protect specific stocks.

 

The PST was revised in 1999. Chinook management changed so that fishing levels would vary in response to the annual production of Chinook salmon (aggregate abundance-based management AABM).  If the ocean abundance of Chinook was poor, then the allowable harvest rates and catches would be reduced so that spawning escapements were protected.  However, if the ocean abundance of Chinook was very good, then harvest rates and catches could increase, but only to a level that still protected spawning escapements.

 

The 1999 PST Annexes specifies allowable landed catches under the AABM management regime for three ocean fishing areas at various levels of Chinook abundance.  These areas are:

 

1.         SE Alaskan troll, net, and sport fisheries;

2.         Northern BC troll and the Queen Charlotte Island sport fishery; and

3.         the west coast of Vancouver Island troll and outside sport fisheries.

 

All other fisheries are referred to as Individual Stock Based Management (ISBM) and will be managed to an overall bilaterally-agreed harvest rate (catch will vary with the abundance of Chinook).  Harvest rates are assessed for individual Canadian and US stocks using coded wire tag (CWT) data and the PSC Chinook Technical Committee (CTC) coast wide model to estimate exploitation rates.

 

For Canadian and US fisheries, the 1999 agreement established a general obligation to reduce exploitation rates in the ISBM fisheries to 63.5% and 60.0% of the respective average exploitation rates during the 1979-1982 base period.  If returns were less than the biologically-based escapement goal then the ISBM fisheries can be required to further reduce their exploitation rates to improve escapements.  If returns were greater than the goal, then the harvest rates (and catch) in ISBM fisheries could be increased so long as the goal was still achieved.  Only one Fraser River Chinook stock has a biologically-based escapement goal (Harrison River) accepted by the PSC Chinook Technical Committee.

 

The major difference between the 1999 agreement and the 1985 PST is the necessity for a pre-season estimation of Chinook abundance in the ocean, and the need for agreed escapement goals for each Chinook stock identified in Attachments I to V of the 1999 agreement.  Chinook forecasts are usually available in March.  The establishment of escapement goals is the responsibility of each management agency but the technical basis for establishing a goal will be reviewed by the PSC Chinook Technical Committee.

3.3.          Special Concerns for 2007

Survival rates for many stocks of Chinook salmon in the Pacific Northwest are substantially lower than they were in the 1980’s.  Of particular concern are some of the earliest returning populations (e.g. Coldwater River, Spius Creek and Upper Chilcotin River).  Escapements to these three early timed populations were very low in both 2005 and 2006.  There is an increasing likelihood that conservation concerns may develop if these populations continue to display very low escapements in upcoming years.[1].  In addition there are several other early timed stocks, Louis Creek, Cottonwood and Westroad, that appear to be in a declining trend as well, although the information is less certain.

 

Migration characteristics of these stocks do not coincide with periods of heavy fishing activity throughout most of their migratory route.  These stocks are usually not affected by adverse weather conditions (high water, high water temperature) but have been found to display low productivity.  Review of recent data suggests that the First Nation fishery in the lower Fraser River exerts the highest harvest rate on these early timed Chinook stocks (Bailey et al. CSAS 2001/134).

 

A review of the status of four early timed stocks within the Fraser River spring run Chinook aggregate (i.e., Upper Chilcotin, Coldwater, Spius, Birkenhead) was undertaken by the Pacific Scientific Advice Review Committee (PSARC) in 2001.  Recommendations resulting from this review were to manage Canadian domestic Chinook fisheries up to the end of April each year in a manner that would not exceed an exploitation rate of 33% on these four stocks.

 

The Department has been managing the spring timed Chinook stocks (which includes the early timed component of this stock aggregate) using a fishing plan that has been reasonably consistent for years 2001 to 2006.  Catches and associated harvest rates have varied during this time period.  Fishing plans for the entire area need to be coordinated to ensure that differing management actions such as new gear and/or separate fishing times do not result in an increased harvest rate on early timed Chinook stocks.

 

Some lower Fraser First Nations have changed their method of fishing from set gill nets to drift gill nets.  The information on changes in catch per unit effort is currently being analyzed.  The analysis is expected to show that larger, more mobile nets have the potential to increase catch per unit effort and therefore, also the harvest rate.

 

Requests have been received from some lower Fraser First Nations for separate fishing times.  The harvest rate impact of providing separate fishing times for First Nation groups in the lower Fraser canyon area must be determined.  It is likely that separate fishing times in the canyon would lead to an increased harvest rate as the most productive sites would be fished for longer periods of time.

 

As of January 26, 2007, lower, middle and upper Fraser and Thompson River watershed snow pack levels were tracking at above normal levels as determined by monitoring stations in these areas.  Further updates on this topic can be found at the following web address:  http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/rfc/


4.             Management Objectives

4.1.          Conservation

Conservation of Chinook is the primary objective and will take precedence in managing the resource.

 

The Department manages fisheries with the objective of ensuring that stocks are returning at sustainable levels.  When returns decline below sustainable levels, management actions are taken which may include reducing the impact of fisheries on specific stocks, strategic enhancement and habitat restoration.

 

Fisheries openings and closures are designed to address conservation requirements first.  Fishing times are adjusted to achieve this requirement, as information regarding run size, harvest rates, and escapement becomes available.

4.2.          Aboriginal fisheries for food, social and ceremonial purposes

The objective is to manage fisheries to ensure that, subject to conservation needs, first priority is accorded to First Nations for opportunities to harvest fish for FSC purposes and any treaty obligations.

 

Consultations are on-going between Resource Management staff and First Nations, both within the Fraser River Watershed and outside the Watershed.  Fishery plans are based upon stock conservation requirements and needs indicated by all Fraser River First Nations.

4.3.          International Allocation

The objective is to manage Canadian treaty fisheries to ensure that obligations within the PST are achieved.

 

Pre-season fishing plans are formally discussed in bilateral meetings with the United States within the framework of the Pacific Salmon Commission.  Scientists from both countries determine catch ceilings in mixed stock fishing areas (AABM fishing areas off the Queen Charlotte Islands and off the West Coast of Vancouver Island) considering the status of each of the stocks migrating through these areas.  Each country is responsible for managing their respective fisheries to ensure these catch ceilings are not exceeded.

4.4.          Domestic Allocations

The objective is to manage fisheries in a manner that is consistent with the Allocation Policy for Pacific Salmon.

 

The Allocation Policy for Pacific Salmon can be found online at:

www-comm.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/publications/allocation/AllocationPolicyoct201.htm

5.             Stock Assessment

5.1.          Management Units

Historically, Chinook salmon in the Fraser River have been divided into management units based on geography and timing however more recently, following a review of Chinook stock structure in 2002, they have been grouped based on life history. Until WSP Conservation Units are confirmed, the five interim management units are:

 

·                 Fraser spring-run age 42

·                 Fraser spring-run age 52

·                 Fraser summer-run age 52

·                 Fraser summer-run age 41

·                 Fraser fall-run age 41

 

Run timing is indicated by the words, spring, summer and fall.  Life history is indicated by a number such as: 42.  The large number represents the total age of the fish from its deposition in the gravel as an egg to its return to spawn.  The subscript number represents the number of winters the fish spent in freshwater during the juvenile stages of their life history.  Interim management units are outlined in Table 1.

 

Watersheds may have more than one population with different life history characteristics (e.g., run timing, time spent in freshwater, etc.).

 

Table 1:  Interim Management Units for Fraser River Chinook salmon

Management Unit

Sample Streams

Indicator Stock

Fraser spring-run

age 42

Bonaparte River, Bessette Creek, Coldwater River, Deadman River , Nicola River, and Spius Creek

Nicola River

Fraser spring-run

age 52

Birkenhead River, Chilcotin River, upper Chilcotin River, Westroad River, Cottonwood River, Elkin Creek, Horsefly River, upper Cariboo River, upper Pitt River, Fraser River mainstem tributaries above Prince George (Bowron, Willow, Slim, McGregor etc.), spring runs of North Thompson and Salmon River in South Thompson

Dome Creek

Fraser summer-run age 52

Chilko River, Quesnel River, Stuart River, Taseko, Lower Cariboo River, and the Clearwater River

Chilko River (proposed)

Fraser summer-run age 41

Lower Shuswap River, Mid Shuswap River, Lower Adams River, Little River, South Thompson River, Lower Thompson River (below Kamloops Lake), and Maria Slough

Lower Shuswap River

Fraser fall-run

age 41

predominantly fish of Harrison River origin (those natural spawners returning to the Harrison River, and transplanted populations to the Chilliwack, Chehalis, and Stave Rivers)

Chilliwack River

 

Long term escapement trends for each management unit are illustrated in Appendix B and C.

5.2.          Lower Fraser River Stocks

Lower Fraser River Chinook stocks are numerically dominated by the fall returning, white-flesh Harrison River stock group, also known as the Fraser fall-run.  The Fraser fall-run stock group includes the original natural population of fall returning Chinook to the Harrison River, and transplanted Harrison origin populations returning to the Chilliwack, Chehalis, and Stave Rivers.  The Fraser fall-run stock group is unusual in that upon fry emergence from the gravel they migrate immediately to the estuary where they rear for three to six weeks before moving offshore instead of staying 60-150 days in freshwater as is typical of most stocks with an ocean-type life history.

 

In addition to the fall-run Chinook populations there are also relatively small, unique populations of spring and summer-run Chinook salmon returning to the lower Fraser River.  These can be either red or white-fleshed stocks that typically exhibit a stream-type life history (i.e., Chinook fry that over-winter in fresh water and migrate to the ocean in their second spring) - Birkenhead, upper Pitt and spring and summer-run Chilliwack River populations are examples of this life history.  Chinook returning to Maria Slough are distinct in the lower Fraser River in that they exhibit a summer-run ocean-type life history pattern.

 

The Chilliwack River watershed has two or possibly three distinct stock groups:

·                 a spring-run population that spawns between Slesse Creek and the Chilliwack Lake outlet,

·                 a summer-run population that predominately spawns in the upper reaches of the lower Chilliwack River above Slesse Creek, and

·                 a transplanted Harrison-origin fall-run population that predominately spawns downstream of the Slesse Creek confluence.

 

Birkenhead Chinook are an early timed spring-run population that is thought to begin returning to the Fraser River as early as February.  Peak migration into the Fraser is thought to occur in early April.  DNA analysis of Albion Test Fishery catch data indicates Birkenhead Chinook continuing to be present in the lower Fraser River to mid-May.

 

These fish are subject to First Nations fisheries in the Fraser mainstem and to First Nation fisheries and a non-retention recreational fishery in the Birkenhead and Lillooet Rivers.  Recreational fishing for Chinook is prohibited in that portion of the Birkenhead River from the Birkenhead Bridge on Portage Road to the canyon approximately 10 km upstream of the bridge from August 1st to September 15th each year.  This closure is to protect these Chinook during their critical spawning time.  In addition, Birkenhead Chinook are far north migrators and are taken in Alaskan and northern troll fishereies and northern marine recreational fisheries.

5.3.          Interior Fraser River Stocks

Chinook salmon in the interior Fraser River (above Hope) comprise a large and complex group of spawning populations.  Interior Fraser Chinook have historically been divided into three major geographical regions:

 

·                 the upper Fraser  (those returning upstream of Prince George and including Nechako),

·                 middle Fraser (downstream of Prince George but excluding the Thompson), and

·                 Thompson (which are divided into lower Thompson/Nicola, North Thompson, and South Thompson/Shuswap).

 

Within these regions, two migration times are recognized: early or spring-run, and summer-run.

5.4.          Stock Assessment Methods

Assessment of the lower Fraser River Chinook spawning stocks rely on visual surveys, a mark-recapture project, and the coded-wire tagging of hatchery produced fish.

 

The Harrison River is the only lower Fraser River system where spawner abundance is estimated by mark-recapture methods.  This project has been conducted annually since 1984.  Since 1985, the Fraser-fall run component returning to the Chilliwack River population has been estimated with an extensive dead pitch program.  Additionally, in certain years, visual surveys of a suite of smaller stocks including Birkenhead and upper Pitt Rivers, as well as Maria Slough provide some information on escapements.

 

In the BC Interior, assessment of these large stock aggregates is largely formed by annual estimates of escapement by aerial surveys, mark-recapture (Nicola River, Louis Creek, and lower Shuswap River), and electronic counter (Deadman River).  Trends in these spawning escapements, comparisons of spawning abundance to Wild Salmon Policy benchmarks, and the relative distribution of spawners among rivers are all used to assess stock status.

 

Additional technical information on stock assessment as it related to exploitation rates can be found in Appendix J.

5.5.          Forecasts

Forecasts of the next year’s pre-fishery ocean abundance and expected escapement of Fraser fall-run (Harrison and Chilliwack rivers) Chinook are developed for use in the Chinook Technical Committee’s coastwide modeling work.  This is the only stock group in the Fraser River, and only one of two Canadian Chinook stocks, for which a forecast is calculated.  Quantitative forecasts for most Fraser River Chinook are not prepared by DFO.  The Chinook Technical Committee coastwide model calculates a forecast of ocean abundance for these stocks in the aggregate.

 

A forecast for 2007 is not available at this time, but will be by mid to late March.  Forecasts are not adjusted in-season since there is insufficient information for updates (e.g. CWT recoveries in southern U.S. fisheries are not reported in-season).

 

Additional technical information on the Harrison River Chinook, stock assessment, and forecasting can be found in Appendix J.

5.6.          Escapement Objectives

The escapement goals currently being used were set in 1986 following negotiation of the original Pacific Salmon Treaty in 1985.  While there were a variety of methodologies that could have been used to determine escapement goals, it was agreed to establish the goals at twice the average escapement observed during the period 1979 to 1982.  This strategy was to be used until 1998 at which time the goals were to be reviewed.  Scientists are now evaluating current information and with the implementation of the Wild Salmon Policy, discussions have commenced regarding identification of Conservation Units.  Following this, lower (conservation) and upper (target) benchmarks will be set based on input from a broad spectrum of interests.

 

More information on setting future escapement goals for Fraser River Chinook populations can be found in Appendix J.

5.7.          Albion Test Fishery

Since 1981, Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) has conducted a Chinook test fishery at Albion, British Columbia (near Fort Langley) from early April to late-October.  The test fishery is conducted each year with a drifted gillnet at a specific site by the Albion ferry crossing in the Fraser River.

 

For each sampling event, two 30-minute sets are made daily - just prior to and after daylight high tide.  The original net was 8-inch mesh, but beginning in 1997 a multi-panel net was used on alternate days.  The multi-panel net consisted of panels of five, six, seven, eight, and nine inch mesh, and was fished identically to the standard net.  The purpose of the multi-panel net was to provide a more accurate sample of the Chinook stock assemblages passing the test fishing area by including both smaller and larger mesh panels.  Intuitively, we expected the catch in the multi-panel net to more fully represent the wide range of body sizes of Fraser River Chinook stocks.

 

Analysis of the 1997 to 2001 data was initiated in 2001.  The primary objective was to identify the new information the multi-panel net provided, particularly as it pertained to in-season management and stock assessment, and assess which net best indexed in-river Chinook abundance.  The secondary objective of the analysis was to establish a relationship between the catch of the standard Chinook (8 inch) and the multi-panel nets in order to provide uniform relative abundance estimates.  The study estimated population specific migration timing and aggregated population abundance indices by using DNA and CWT information to estimate the population origin of individual fish.  This analysis indicated that the test fishery adequately measured in-river abundance (Parken et al. 2004).

 

The operation of the test fishery in 2006 was the same as in 2005; alternate days fishing with the standard 8 inch mesh net and the multi-panel net.  The total 2006 catch from both nets from April 1, 2006 to October 20, 2006 was 1334 Chinook.  The cumulative catch per unit effort (CPUE) for the 8 inch net from April 1 to October 20 was 148.22 (adjusted for days the multi-panel net was fished).  This value is approximately 50% of the long term average.  Catch information from the Albion Test Fishery can be found in Appendix A or at:

 

http://www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/fraserriver/commercial.htm.

 

Legal decisions in 2006 from cases involving the use of fish to fund departmental activities may significantly affect test fishing activities.  The implications to the operation of the Albion test fishery have not yet been resolved.

6.             Enhancement

Egg targets, eggs taken and fry/smolt release details for all South Coast hatcheries can be found in the South Coast Integrated Fisheries Management Plan for Salmon available online at:

 

http://www-ops2.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/xnet/content/MPLANS/MPlans.htm

6.1.          Chilliwack River Hatchery

On the Chilliwack River, the spring Chinook population is thought to be a mixed population of indigenous and transplanted mid-Fraser stocks.  From 1985 to 1988, mid/upper Fraser River Chinook were transplanted from Bowron (Spring-run 52), Slim (Spring-run 52), Finn (Spring-run 52), Chilko (Summer-run 52) and Quesnel (Summer-run 52), stocks.  Between 1981 and 1985, some upper Pitt (Spring run 52) white-fleshed Chinook were transplanted into this system to reportedly bolster a weak summer-run.  Harrison Chinook were transplanted to the Chilliwack River in the early 1980’s.  This population is sustained predominately through continuing enhancement by the Chilliwack hatchery.  Escapements of the spring and summer-run populations are significantly smaller than those of the fall-run population.

6.2.          Chehalis Hatchery

The Chehalis River historically had a spring/summer-run red-fleshed Chinook population that was enhanced in the late eighties with summer-run red-fleshed populations from Slim Creek and Chilliwack River.  This population arrives on the spawning grounds in late June to July with peak of spawn usually occurring from late August to early September.

6.3.          Birkenhead Hatchery

The Birkenhead Hatchery on the Birkenhead River was established in 1977.  The hatchery suffered devastating damage in the flood of the fall of 2003 and is now closed.  This volunteer-run hatchery was operated by the Pemberton Wildlife Association (PWA) and enhanced both Chinook and coho.  The impact of the hatchery closure is unknown.  Historical CWT tag returns indicated 15 - 25% contribution of enhanced Chinook to the run.  As Birkenhead Chinook have a five year life cycle, 2007 will likely be the last year we will see returns from this hatchery enhancement program.

6.4.          Interior Fraser Chinook Enhancement

Since the early 1980’s, the main hatcheries enhancing upper Fraser River Chinook have been the Eagle, Shuswap, Clearwater, and Spius (all Thompson); the Quesnel (mid-Fraser); and Stuart (upper Fraser).  Since the early 1990’s, the Clearwater, Eagle, Quesnel, and Stuart facilities have been closed.  Some enhancement still occurs throughout the watershed, mostly linked to stock assessment and the production of coded-wire tag mark groups.  Overall, enhancement is thought to have a relatively small effect on the total number of Chinook returning to the interior Fraser although the effects on certain watersheds may be significant (e.g., Nicola watershed enhanced by Spius hatchery and Shuswap stocks from the Shuswap hatchery).

7.             First Nations Fisheries

7.1.          2006 Fishery Summary

First Nations both in and outside the Fraser River are provided with an opportunity to harvest Fraser River Chinook.  The number of fishing days is dependent upon the conservation needs of Chinook stocks and other species, such as sockeye, wild steelhead and Interior Fraser coho salmon.  Alterations to fishing patterns, reached via consensus, are subject to ensuring escapement requirements are met.

 

Once sockeye enter the Fraser River, management actions are driven by considerations for those stocks and Chinook are generally harvested as by-catch.  Conservation concerns for wild steelhead and coho salmon have resulted in net fisheries being curtailed from early September to mid October in recent years.  There is no information available that would suggest this pattern will change in the near future.

 

Stock identification information indicates that those Chinook stocks entering the river from February to July 15 are bound for tributary systems in the lower Thompson basin, the middle and upper Fraser basins, as well as the Birkenhead River in the Harrison River system.  These stocks are understood to have a low productivity and individual stocks range in size from 100 to > 10,000 spawners.

 

Pre-season consultations with Lower Fraser First Nations in 2006 resulted in a fishing regime, reached via consensus, that was designed to reduce the impacts on the earliest timed Chinook stocks.

 

In 2006, selective Chinook fisheries took place in those times when Early Stuart sockeye were migrating through the river.  There were no targeted fisheries on Early Stuart sockeye as these fish were forecast to return at numbers well below the cycle average.  In the Lower River (downstream of Sawmill Creek) selective Chinook fisheries utilized 8 inch drifted gill nets and additional monitoring to ensure that impacts on sockeye were minimal.  In the areas upstream of Sawmill Creek, the use of dip nets or rod and reel was authorized.

 

A table of First Nations fishery openings and catch for 2006 can be found in Appendix E.

7.2.          Catch Monitoring

All First Nation’s fisheries are authorized by communal licence.  The majority of areas have catch monitoring systems in place to estimate catches.  In areas where there is not a specific catch monitoring program, the fisher is required by licence to report his/her catch to the band and the band to report to DFO.

 

Areas where specific catch reporting programs have been implemented include:

 

a)     Below the Port Mann Bridge

 

During fisheries for food, social, and ceremonial purposes, catch monitoring is undertaken by Aboriginal Fishery Officers and First Nations fishery monitors who collect hail information from the fishers. This information is compiled by each band and forwarded to DFO following the close of the fishery.

 

b)     Port Mann Bridge to Sawmill Creek

 

i)  Set net and drift net fishery between Port Mann Bridge and Mission:

Charter Patrolmen count effort and take on-the-water hails during the Katzie, Kwantlen and Matsqui drift net fisheries.  In addition, First Nations monitors collect hails at Katzie Reserve Dock, Barnston Island and the Kwantlen Reserve Dock at Fort Langley.  Set net fishers hail in their data by phone to band fisheries offices.

 

ii)  Set net and drift net fishery between Mission and Sawmill Creek:

Monitors are stationed at main access points on the river during daylight hours, every day that the fishery is open to collect catch per unit effort (CPUE) and 24-hour effort surveys.  Sites include: Leq’a:mel, Island 22/Kilby, Skway, Scowlitz, Seabird, Agassiz Bridge, Hunter Creek, Chawathil Reserve, Coquihalla, and Yale Beach.  A First Nations supervisor oversees the monitors at their sites, and ensures that they have the necessary data collection forms.

 

Helicopter over flights are used to conduct instantaneous gear counts between Mission and Sawmill Creek.  These over flights are conducted once during the fishery and require one flight technician on each flight.

 

Data collection forms are gathered from each of the monitors at the various monitoring sites and provided to DFO.  DFO then produces catch estimates for each opening by expanding the catch rates by effort counts to generate weekly catch estimates.

 

c)     Sawmill Creek to Kelly Creek and the Thompson River downstream of the Bonaparte River, Kelly Creek upstream to Deadman Creek and Deadman Creek to Naver Creek

 

A sample survey program during FN directed chinook fisheries is conducted by FNs /DFO staff along the Fraser River between Sawmill Creek and Kelly Creek and in the Thompson River downstream of the Bonaparte River confluence. Fishery Technicians interview all fishers encountered during random roving vehicle patrols to obtain catch and effort information (CPUE).  Fishing effort is obtained by averaging the count of each type of active gear observed during a given week.

 

No catch monitoring program was undertaken in the mainstem Fraser River from Kelly Creek upstream to Deadman Creek during directed First Nation chinook fisheries.  Catch and effort in directed Chinook fisheries in this area is extremely small.  Catch monitoring is undertaken by members of the High Bar Indian Band when sockeye fisheries occur in this area.  Chinook caught incidentally in fisheries directed on sockeye salmon are enumerated.

 

Very limited First Nation fisheries directed on Chinook salmon occur in the mainstem Fraser River from Deadman Creek to Naver Creek.  Accordingly, no monitoring program is in place to monitor catch in directed Chinook fisheries. Monitoring occurs during directed sockeye fisheries in this area and Chinook harvested incidentally to directed sockeye fisheries are enumerated.

 

d)    Naver Creek upstream and the Nechako River to Isle Pierre

 

Lheidli T’enneh Nation monitor each of the fisheries via collecting hail information from the fishers.

 

e)    Nechako River upstream of Isle Pierre and the Stuart System

 

Lheidli T’enneh Nation monitor each of the fisheries via collecting hail information from the fishers.

 

f)     Thompson River upstream of the Bonaparte River

 

The Secwepemc (Shuswap) Nation Fisheries Commission monitor each of the fisheries on a census basis utilizing staff from their individual member bands.

 

g)    Shuswap River (Shuswap Falls to Mabel Lake)

 

The Okanagan Nation Alliance monitor their fisheries on a census basis utilizing staff from their individual member bands.

7.3.          2007 Fishing Plan

The objective of the 2007 harvest strategy for early season First Nations fisheries is to provide access to First Nations for food, social and ceremonial needs while addressing fishery exploitation rate concerns on early timed Fraser Chinook stocks.  Fisheries in the latter part of the year are managed to protect other stocks of concern such as wild steelhead and Interior Fraser coho stocks

 

The following management approach is presented for consideration:

 

·                 In order to provide for clear migration of Early timed Fraser Chinook create a weekly window closure during which there would be no fishing for the period March 15 until April 30.

 

Note:  First Nations fisheries for Chinook on the Lower Fraser generally start around March 15.

 

The Department also encourages discussion among all Fraser River First Nation groups in the watershed in the development of fishing plans.  Improved discussion and coordination regarding the development of a Fraser River watershed Chinook fishing plan for First Nations will assist in addressing conservation concerns for all early timed Fraser River Chinook stocks.

 

Selective fisheries may be considered during periods of increased Chinook abundance.  Selective methods must ensure that co-migrating stocks of concern are avoided or released unharmed.  First Nations are encouraged to submit their selective fishing proposals as soon as possible.  Compliance with 2006 licence conditions for selective fisheries will be considered during the review of selective fishing proposals.

8.             Recreational Fisheries

8.1.          Fishery Summary

The marine waters off the Pacific coast of British Columbia are generally open for harvest of Chinook salmon year round.  Recreational harvest is constrained using daily and annual limits.  The coast-wide daily limit for chinook is two.  The total chinook annual limit is 30 from any tidal waters, of which at most, 10 may be caught in the tidal waters of the Fraser River; 15 may be caught in the waters of Areas 12 to 18, 28 and 29 and that portion of Area 19 north of Cadboro Point; 20 may be caught in the waters of Area 20 and that portion of Area 19 south of Cadboro Point.

 

Recreational harvest is further constrained using minimum size limits (minimum size limit 45 cm coast wide with the exception of a 62 cm size limit in Johnstone Strait, the Strait of Georgia and the Fraser River mouth), maximum size limits (in some areas), reduced daily quotas and closed areas.  Closed areas may be closed year-round or closed seasonally depending on local stocks.

 

Historically, the recreational fishery in the Fraser River, downstream from Sawmill Creek was open year-round with a daily limit of 4 Chinook and no annual limit.  In 1980, the fishery was closed to assist in rebuilding Chinook stocks.  When the fishery re-opened, it started on June 1st of each year.  In 1998, the recreational Chinook fishery was opened on May 1 based on an assessment that the additional fishing time and associated catch and effort would not compromise long term sustainability of Fraser Chinook stocks.

 

In 2006, the Lower Fraser River recreational fishery was open from May 1st to December 31.

 

In all non-tidal waters there is an annual limit of 10 Chinook.  Daily limits range from one to two adults per day.  In the Lower Fraser River, an adult Chinook is defined as a Chinook over 50 cm in length except during the fall when the larger Harrison origin fish predominate.  From September 1 to December 31 in those waters downstream of the Agassiz-Rosedale Bridge, an adult Chinook is defined as being over 62 cm.

 

Details on recreational Chinook opportunities may be found online at: 

 

            http://www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/recfish/default_e.htm

8.2.          Catch Monitoring

DFO obtains most of its catch information through the Creel Survey Program which is carried out in recreational fisheries that have displayed important catch and effort characteristics in past years.  This program incorporates surveys by land (access point and roving surveys) and air of active fishermen.

 

In 2006, the lower Fraser River was surveyed between Sumas and Hope from May 1st to October 9th, and the Chilliwack River was surveyed from September 15th to November 15th.  While Nicomen Slough and Norrish Creek were surveyed from October 9th to November 30th, anglers were not allowed to retain Chinook in these two systems.

 

Chinook salmon recreational openings in specific sections of the Fraser River upstream of Sawmill Creek, the Bridge River, the lower Shuswap River, Mabel Lake and the Thompson River at Spences Bridge are also surveyed during their open times.  Preliminary catch numbers are available in Appendixes G, H, and I.

 

The Strait of Georgia (STG) creel operates from May to October and covers Areas 13 to 19, 28, 29 and that portion of Area 20 east of Sherringham Point.  In most years, the Victoria portion of Area 19 is creeled for the full year, however, in 2006 the November period was not covered due to budgetary concerns.

 

The Strait of Juan de Fuca (the portion of Area 20 west of Sherringham Point) and the West Coast of Vancouver Island (Areas 23 to 27, 121 and 123 to 127) are covered by the West Coast (WC) creel program which operates from June to September.  Fishing effort drops markedly after Labour Day.

 

The Johnstone Strait (Area 12) creel program goes from July to August, the time period of most effort.

 

Information on creeled areas is provided in Appendix F.

8.3.          2007 Fishing Plan

For 2007, the Department will be consulting on the following:

 

·                 Allowing retention of Chinook on the Fraser River downstream of the Alexandra Bridge as of May 1.

·                 The proposed daily limit is 4 Chinook, only one of which may be an adult*.  The possession limit is two times the daily limit.  The gear permitted is one line per angler, with a single, barbless hook restriction in place.  A bar rig is also permitted but only in those waters downstream of the Mission Bridge.

 

*An adult Chinook is defined as being over 50 cm except from September 1 to December 31, in those waters downstream of the Agassiz-Rosedale Bridge when an adult Chinook is defined as being over 62 cm.

 

Tables outlining the proposed tidal and non tidal recreational Chinook opportunities in the Strait of Georgia and Fraser River watershed for the 2007 fishing season are provided in Appendix G.

9.             Commercial

9.1.          Overall Commercial Fishery Summary

Fraser River Chinook migrating along northern (Johnstone Strait) and southern (Juan de Fuca Strait) approach routes to the Fraser River are harvested in a number of fisheries.  These fish are taken as by-catch in sockeye net fisheries (seine and gillnet) in Johnstone Strait, Juan de Fuca Strait, Fraser River and Alaska.  In addition, there are directed fisheries for Chinook by WCVI, North Coast and Alaskan troll fisheries.  Only very limited directed commercial net fisheries (i.e., 2004 Area E gillnet exploratory fishery) have occurred within the Fraser River since 1980.

 

During the last seven years, a mandatory non-retention requirement in all South and North Coast seine fisheries has significantly reduced Chinook mortalities.  Over the past few years the majority of the Fraser River commercial Chinook catch has been taken in the Area F commercial troll fishery in northern B.C. waters.  Fall-run Chinook stocks are also harvested in the Area G commercial troll fishery off the west coast of Vancouver Island.

 

The principal U.S. fisheries harvesting Fraser River Chinook are the net fisheries in Juan de Fuca Strait, the San Juan Islands area, and off Point Roberts.  The Fraser Chinook catch taken in Southeast Alaska is unknown but thought to be smaller.

9.2.          Catch Monitoring

Commercial catch data for the salmon fishery is gathered primarily from fisher hail reports, fish slips, mandatory phone catch reporting requirements, logbooks, on board observers, offload sampling and CWT catch sampling programs.  Fish slips are required when fish are sold, offloaded or taken home for personal consumption.  The number and weight of each salmon species landed and/or sold are required on the slip.

 

DFO obtains further information about salmon average weight data through a Mark Recovery Program (MRP).  This program involves collecting salmon heads from adipose fin clipped fish from commercial, recreational and aboriginal  landings.  When the samplers are at a plant, they also collect individual salmon weights to contribute to the average weight estimate.  An average weight estimate is obtained by species, and gear, MRP catch region and fishing period (week).  The average weight is used to calculate pieces from the total weight reported on the fish slips.

 

A table of all Canadian commercial catches of Chinook can be found in Appendix H.

9.3.          Area E Gillnet – Fraser River

Directed gillnet fisheries for Chinook within the Fraser River have been closed since 1980 in order to rebuild stocks.  Retention of Chinook by-catch is permitted during the in-river commercial gillnet sockeye fisheries that take place from late July to early September and chum fisheries in October and November.

 

In 2004, Area E Gillnet Association (AEGA) submitted a multi-year proposal to conduct a limited opportunity "exploratory" Chinook-targeted fishery.  The planned timing of this fishery was late July to mid-August, within the peak abundance timing period of the summer run Chinook aggregate. Fisheries were planned to occur during times when a commercial sockeye TAC was available for harvest.

 

Plans to continue with year two of this proposal in 2005 and 2006 were cancelled.

 

During pre-season discussions with AEGA advisors, the possibility of continuing  the chinook exploratory program in 2007 will be reviewed.  DFO staff will continue evaluating the status of chinook stocks and reviewing the impacts of this fishery.  In reviewing the viability and direction of this proposal, the Department will be consulting with First Nations and stakeholders in order to make a decision about the future direction of this initiative.

9.4.          Area G Troll – West Coast of Vancouver Island

Under the Pacific Salmon Treaty, West Coast of Vancouver Island chinook fisheries are managed through an Aggregate Abundance Based Management model.  Fisheries are prosecuted on an aggregate of different U.S. and Canadian chinook stocks.  Abundance forecasts provide estimates for 2 years in advance.  The fall 2005 stock information was used to forecast the aggregate abundance of all Chinook stocks for fall 2006 through to fall 2007.

 

The 2006 forecast information provides for a domestic surplus of approximately 160,400 Chinook for the 2006-2007 chinook year.  (October 1, 2006 to September 30, 2007).  For planning purposes, the domestic harvest levels are estimated to be:

 

·                 First Nations FSC – 5,000 pieces

·                 Recreational – in the range of 40,000 to 50,000 pieces

·                 Area G Commercial – in the range of 120,000 to 110,000 pieces

 

It is important to note that the aggregate abundance can, and usually does change in April when stock information from the previous fall can be entered in the model.  It is possible that in April 2007, the aggregate chinook abundance will increase; which in turn will increase the number of chinook available for domestic harvest requirements.

5.         Area H Troll – Strait of Georgia

Area H trollers are planning to submit a Chinook sampling program, similar to previous years, to the Department for consideration.  The objectives of the Area H proposal are to:

·       Determine areas and times where stocks of concern can be avoided while targeting abundant stocks by gathering stock composition information;

·       Gather catch and biological information on Chinook stocks focusing on months where significant data gaps are thought to exist; and

·       Use the information to investigate the feasibility of a future small troll fishery for Area H.

 

The focus for 2007 will be on Area 29 and the terminal (near Fraser River mouth) assessment of the South Thompson and Harrison Chinook by sampling in August and September.  The Area H Association will be paying for all costs of analyzing the DNA samples and providing a written report to the Department.

 

The Area H Chinook sampling program was designed to determine stock composition in a variety of areas during different time periods.  This project has been reduced to focus on the more abundant stocks in the Fraser River (i.e. South Thompson and Harrison origin) to gather Chinook stock composition through DNA sampling, to confirm the impacts on by-catch while determining the viability of troll harvest in the terminal area of the Fraser River.  All sampling and analysis is funded by Area H.  The data generated can then be used in future discussions and consultations regarding the possibility for a limited catch controlled fishery when and if stocks and access policy warrant.

9.5.          Area F Troll – North Coast

Prior to 2005, the Salmon Licence Area F (Northern Troll) fishery was managed under a limited entry licensing system with the total harvest controlled largely through fishery openings and closures.  The fishery itself was operated in a competitive "derby" style where all licensed fishers are entitled to fish in order to maximize their harvest during the open periods.

 

In 2005 and 2006, a demonstration fishery was conducted to test the feasibility and the benefits of changing the management of the fishery to an Individual Transferable Quota (ITQ) system.  The implementation of this system directly controlled the total harvest by setting limits on the harvest by individual fishers.

 

A Chinook allocation to the fleet is calculated based on the Aggregate Abundance Based Management model.  For 2006, that allowable catch of chinook for the combined North Coast Troll and Queen Charlotte Islands recreational fishery was 223,200 pieces.  The pre-season estimate of recreational catch was 70,000 pieces, leaving 153,200 fish as the pre-season troll allocation.  The North Coast trollers landed 158,363 Chinook in 2006 and the Queen Charlotte Island recreational catch was 64,500 fish for a total Chinook catch of 222,863.

 

Chinook catches in the North Coast troll fishery were sampled and DNA analyses were conducted.  This fishery is constrained by a management objective designed to limit the exploitation of Chinook stocks originating from the West Coast of Vancouver Island.  Due to these constraints the fishery generally does not open until mid-May to early June and closes in September.  Based on this analysis approximately 45% of the 2006 Area F Troll Chinook catch originated from the Fraser River system.  With the majority of the Fraser Chinook (88%) originating from the South Thompson River.

 

Results from the 2006 Area F Sampling Program are presented in Appendix H.


Appendix A: Albion Test Fishery

 

The following figures summarize catches in the Albion Chinook test fishery for 2006 and compare these catches with data averaged from previous years.  Figure 1 gives the daily catch per unit effort (CPUE) and compares it to the average of the historical data from 1981-2005. Figure 2 give cumulative CPUE and compares it to average cumulative CPUE from 1981 - 2005. The advantage of viewing CPUE cumulatively is a better understanding of the total success of the year’s fishery as compared to the historical average.

 


Appendix B: Chinook escapement estimates to tributaries in the lower Fraser River

 

Early timed stocks are highlighted and indicator stocks are presented in bold italics.

 

            M.R.    mark-recapture study design

            n/r       none recorded (escapement program did not proceed)

            n/o       none observed

     *    Near Final

   **    Preliminary


Appendix C: 1993-2006 Chinook escapement estimates to tributaries in the BC Interior

 

C.T.C. Indicator Stream

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spring - Run Age 1.3 ( 5 sub 2 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Upper Pit River

175

N/R

N/R

N/R

N/R

N/R

N/R

N/R

N/R

276

171

N/R

341

N/A

Birkenhead River*

241

343

162

293

573

565

147

404

624

463

427

180

1425

1162

Bridge River

950

615

851

1900

1968

626

898

769

198

969

N/I

1115

183

109

Chilcotin River

3100

6354

3480

2285

4000

1636

2896

2971

1574

2092

3396

1064

1509

1027

Cottonwood River

4470

4690

2100

1750

3329

2592

641

1208

781

1352

1555

1241

646

740

Horsefly River

200

4154

185

400

115

43

137

174

281

380

246

375

509

345

Westroad River

3200

6150

6050

4615

7206

3827

984

1600

1924

1620

2966

1366

846

1052

Bowron River

6140

9104

8316

4577

7334

7618

3455

3220

5491

8719

10059

8160

4074

3876

Fraser R. ( Tete Juane )

3300

4240

6000

4100

2935

2586

2081

2262

4976

3913

3048

2062

2535

2142

Goat River

55

293

400

440

354

302

89

212

411

820

569

174

151

158

Holmes River

2100

1877

2600

2775

3203

2362

523

1795

1018

3740

4110

1376

821

1458

Horsey River

130

unk

120

20

75

57

14

128

78

308

288

62

34

146

McKale River

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

20

present

32

9

81

49

68

78

11

McGregor Tributaries

unk

1851

2412

3461

2505

4471

1870

2449

2420

3751

4103

3253

1310

1333

Chilako Creek

25

119

200

624

186

39

115

20

7

229

N/I

106

202

168

Endako River

20

200

125

167

43

191

171

160

275

292

N/I

N/I

252

118

Ormond Creek

N/R

N/R

N/R

N/R

N/R

N/R

N/R

N/R

N/R

N/R

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

Nevin Creek

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

161

46

62

57

132

385

238

77

174

Slim Creek

1300

2473

4634

2268

3130

2664

1235

2112

2876

3021

3676

2284

2161

2204

Swift Creek

1000

886

1700

1500

1200

1098

375

486

982

1535

835

520

335

643

Walker Creek

150

240

101

426

122

392

206

252

177

381

543

277

103

234

Torpy River

1000

1921

1590

1055

1042

2293

1819

1468

1755

2565

4457

2730

1027

1221

Willow River

600

1170

817

1612

1961

2041

717

1314

893

1033

1980

1887

1012

1206

Barriere River

50

44

21

unk

unk

N.I.

present

77

362

377

131

306

220

215

Finn Creek

1300

1837

810

1569

725

632

524

1511

1115

650

45

538

185

157

Eagle River

1100

1200

700

780

915

N.I.

624

1085

1397

1458

1583

867

427

521

Salmon River ( Prince George )

25

729

901

1054

1200

1362

823

634

478

429

2395

1681

668

544

Salmon River ( Salmon Arm )

1850

800

700

727

252

284

350

357

1362

1003

89

395

307

554

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stock Aggregate Totals

32481

51290

44975

38398

44373

37862

20740

26761

31521

41589

47106

32325

21438

20247

 

* historical estimates to the Birkenhead River are currently under review.


 

C.T.C. Indicator Stream

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spring Run Age 1.2 ( 4 sub 2 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deadman River

1200

1591

540

1506

934

665

350

787

780

1940

 

1159

417

1234

Spius Creek

900

150

500

500

450

300

52

668

603

1012

1170

1866

291

529

Coldwater River

1500

275

1050

1500

400

300

267

497

781

1394

1195

1018

183

478

Nicola River

4000

7970

6500

16400

7614

1211

7263

8808

7771

11643

14574

7850

2926

3863

Louis Creek

20

510

800

420

480

377

183

611

349

481

198

105

63

297

Bessette Creek

270

100

280

400

N.I.

150

404

360

323

350

N/O

182

18

241

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stock Aggregate Totals

7890

10596

9670

20726

9878

3003

8519

11731

10607

16820

17137

12180

3898

6642

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summer Run Age 1.3 ( 5 sub 2 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Portage Creek

330

36

N/R

300

N/R

18

200

46

248

445

158

103

86

248

Seton River

150

69

N/R

N/I

N/R

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/O

6

5

N/I

Present

N/I

Chilko River

6343

5665

10461

17000

16272

14549

8920

9171

10891

11027

21625

16287

7668

5201

Quesnel River

5028

1549

3073

3100

3185

4906

1620

1718

2418

5520

5265

3356

3230

2665

Cariboo River

2480

2000

817

1850

1800

936

573

744

503

1097

2198

351

526

949

Stuart River

1000

2420

3730

7415

6221

4642

3875

1875

1954

Present

Present

Present

Present

Present

Nechako River

664

1144

1689

2040

1954

1868

1917

N/A

9331

5546

4077

5189

3217

7376

Stellako River

N/R

10

N/R

N/R

N/R

15

18

N/R

N/R

N/R

N/O

N/I

231

0

Clearwater River

2700

5450

5100

7780

7830

7007

3837

4563

5051

5689

6234

4622

3519

3768

Raft River

190

935

1371

870

1230

309

712

936

237

443

311

741

109

141

North Thompson River

2400

4164

N.I.

2375

2130

2156

3375

2732

3175

2200

1989

N/I

N/I

N/I

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stock Aggregate Totals

21285

23337

26241

42430

40622

36388

24847

21739.4

33560

31522

41699

30546

18586

20100

 


 


C.T.C. Indicator Stream

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summer Run Age 0.3 ( 4 sub 1 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maria Slough

N/R

N/R

N/R

100

100

150

198

266

400

1200

823

N/R

439

314

Adams River

800

1800

1900

2200

3400

4182

2029

2266

5890

3674

2496

2216

3837

6344

Little River

unk

400

150

3000

1850

1246

1163

2043

9885

3680

2488

6000

7504

8590

Lower Shuswap River

6000

10150

10000

19000

13100

16704

24691

20409

18349

19327

21380

13329

12927

28828

Middle Shuswap River

2500

4000

3000

5000

3800

4474

2449

2617

3022

5442

4799

1415

1883

5468

Thompson River (Below Kamloops Lake)

 

 

 

 

 

2015

3205

6904

18927

N/A

10010

Present

23646

South Thompson River

4000

3000

5500

21600

27000

41277

22675

17560

36740

51298

38178

38592

61837

103387

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stock Aggregate Totals

13300

19350

20550

50900

49250

68033

55220

48366

81190

103548

70164

71562

88427

176577

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Late Run Age 0.3 ( 4 sub 1 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harrison River, Falls

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non CTC Indicator Streams

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spring - Run Age 1.3 ( 5 sub 2 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Baker Creek

300

250

250

150

292

420

47

282

268

420

423

N/I

N/I

51

Dome Creek

575

530

550

571

625

400

309

198

49

450

444

270

224

248

East Twin Creek

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

64

N.I.

18

35

51

52

62

12

25

Holliday Creek

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

N

N.I.

15

74

126

48

54

17

72

Humbug Creek

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

N.I.

26

22

85

35

N/A

N/I

N/I

Kazchek Creek

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

0

present

Present

N/O

N /O

6

8

N/I

N/I

Kenneth Creek

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

132

17

65

58

338

148

N/A

N/I

N/I

Kuzkwa

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

215

300

345

245

 

N/A

Naver Creek

250

250

150

150

777

994

57

231

240

281

489

N/I

N/I

236

Narcosli Creek

250

350

250

150

757

254

161

145

383

129

382

N/I

N/I

89

Pinchi Creek

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

present

45

14

Present

15

25

 

N/A

Ptarmigan Creek

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

58

103

49

8

66

140

N/A

N/I

N/I

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1375

1380

1200

1021

2451

2322

694

1074

1366

2246

2104

664

29

721

 

Spring - Run Age 1.3 ( 5 sub 2 ) Cont….

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C.T.C. Non Indicator Stream

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Small Creek

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

115

66

34

48

268

212

6

15

77

Snoeshoe Creek

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

N

N

N/I

N/I

165

66

N/I

N/I

N/I

Fraser River (Tete Juane)

3300

4240

6000

4100

2935

2586

2081

2262

4976

3913

3048

2062

2535

2142

Upper Cariboo River

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

407

198

367

N/I

N/I

477

West Twin Creek

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

24

N.I.

34

14

22

108

40

58

75

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3300

4240

6000

4100

2935

2725

2147

2330

5445

4566

3801

2108

2608

2694

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stock Aggregate Totals

4675

5620

7200

5121

5386

5047

2841

3404

6811

6812

5905

2772

2637

3415

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spring Run Age 1.2 ( 4 sub 2 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bonaparte River

1500

4283

4157

4391

10084

1864

1954

5258

6150

8216

8470

7990

3516

3995

 

4000

7970

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stock Aggregate Totals

5500

12253

4157

4391

10084

1864

1954

5258

6150

8216

8470

7990

3516

3995

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summer Run Age 1.3 ( 5 sub 2 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adams River ( Upper )

unk

unk

128

220

275

100

107

60

109

46

150

238

N/I

165

Blue River

8

48

35

0

0

110

11

235

88

480

329

152

N/I

212

Chilcotin River ( Upper )

200

450

262

735

360

617

285

229

243

523

678

220

97

158

Eagle River

1100

1200

700

780

915

N.I.

624

1085

1397

1458

1583

867

426

521

Elkin Creek

450

508

786

1250

806

651

417

394

458

420

1038

N/I

N/I

N/I

Lemieux Creek

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

216

115

117

155

N/O

194

28

297

Lion Creek

12

150

65

95

N.I.

N.I.

34

0

3

N/O

N/I

N/I

N/I

N/I

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stock Aggregate Totals

1770

2356

1976

3080

2356

1478

1694

2119

2415

3082

3778

1671

551

976

 

 


Appendix D: CTC Indicator Stocks

 

In 1986, DFO established interim escapement goals for British Columbia Chinook stocks.  The escapement goals were set at either double the averaged escapement for the 1979-82 base period or, for key streams, double the 1984 escapement estimate.  These escapement goals are not biologically-based and consequently, they are not used for stock assessment and management of stock impacts under the Pacific Salmon Treaty.  The Lower Fraser fall run has a biologically-based escapement goal range between 75,000 and 101,000 based on a stock-recruitment analysis (Brown et al. 2001).  Biologically-based escapement goals based on habitat carrying capacity, are being developed and several examples for Fraser River stocks are available (Parken et al. 2006;  described in Appendix L).

 

Fraser Spring Run 52 (CTC Indicator Stocks)

Text Box:



Fraser Spring Run 42 (CTC Indicator Stocks)

Text Box:

Fraser Summer Run 52 (CTC Indicator Stocks)

Text Box:

 


Fraser Summer Run 41 (CTC Indicator Stocks)

Text Box:

Text Box:  Harrison Fall Run 41 (CTC Indicator Stocks)

 


 

Appendix E: Fraser River First Nations Fishing Times and Catch by Area

 

2006 Fraser River First Nations Fishing Times:

Area and Gear

Dates

Hours per Week 

Mouth to Pt Mann Bridge-drift net

Mar. 26 - Apr. 9

24 hours per week

 

Apr. 16 - Apr. 23

36 hours per week

 

Apr. 30 - June 25

48 hours per week

Mouth to Pt Mann Bridge – drift net

July 2 - July 23

48 hours per week*

Pt Mann Bridge to Sawmill Creek-drift net

Mar. 19 - Apr. 23

10 hours per week

 

Apr. 30 - June 25

12 hours per week

Emory Creek to Yale Creek-drift net

July 2-16

30 hours per week*

Kanaka Creek to Mission Bridge-drift net

July 9

12 hours per week*

Kanaka Creek to Emory Creek-drift net

July 16-23

24 hours per week*

Jone’s Hill to Jespersen’s-drift net

July 17-23

36 hours per week*

Pt Mann Bridge to Sawmill Creek- set net

Mar. 19 - Apr. 23

24 hours per week

 

Apr. 30 - June 25

48 hours per week

Sawmill Creek to Texas Creek and

April 5 - May 28

4 days per week

the Thompson River – set net

May 28 -July 2

7 days week

 

July 2-July 27

7 days per week**

 

July 27-Sept. 20

7 days per week

 

Sept. 20 – Oct. 8

7 days per week**

Texas Creek to Deadman Creek – set net

April 5 – Jul 2

7 days per week

 

July 2-July 27

7 days per week**

 

July 27- Sept. 27

7 days per week

 

Sept. 27 – Oct. 8

7 days per week**

Deadman Creek upstream – set net

April 5- June 13

Closed ***

 

June 13 - July 5

7 days per week

 

July 5- Aug 5

7 days per week**

 

Aug 5- Dec 31

7 days per week

 

 

 

A table of catches for 2006 can be found in Appendix E.

* Selective fisheries for chinook used 8” mesh drifted gill nets.

** Selective fisheries for chinook used dip nets or rod and reel.

***  Little interest by FN’s to fish as few Chinook in this area until after June 20


2006 Annual Summary of First Nations Fisheries Chinook Catch by Area in the Fraser River Mainstem and Tributaries

 


AREA

Chinook
(directed fisheries)


Total Chinook

Mainstem Fraser

Below Port Mann Bridge

1884*

2696

Port Mann Bridge to Mission

1154*

2059

Mission to Hope

 

2446* 

6095

Hope to Sawmill Creek

3528*

7078

Sawmill Creek to Texas Creek

1415a

1746

Texas Creek to Kelly Creek

464a

593

Kelly Creek to Deadman Creek

0a

1

Deadman Creek to Marguerite Ferry

6b

13

Naver Creek to Shelly & Nechako R to Isle Pierre

290c

315

Mainstem Subtotals

11187

20597


Tributaries

Harrison River

0*

71

Lillooet River System

unknown

unknown

Thompson River downstream of Bonaparte River confluence

0d

240

Thompson River upstream of Bonaparte River confluence

5d

1292

Chilcotin River System

n/md

20

Nechako River System upstream of Isle Pierre

n/mc

0

Stuart River System

n/mc

2

Tributary Subtotal

5

1625

Totals

11193

22222

 

* This number represents the catch to July 25, 2006 (i.e.: First Nations directed Chinook fishery). After that date, Chinook were taken as by-catch in sockeye and chum directed fisheries.

 

a This number represents the catch to July 27th in First Nations directed Chinook fisheries.

b This number represents the catch to August 1st in First Nations directed Chinook fisheries.

c This number represents the catch to August 6th in First Nations directed Chinook fisheries.

d This number represents the catch to July 2nd in First Nations directed Chinook fisheries.

n/m – no monitoring conducted at that time.

 

Please note, the Fraser River is permanently closed from Williams Creek to Petch Creek. Kelly Creek to Barney Creek and The Lillooet River System was not monitored.  The Harrison River upstream of the Highway 7 Bridge was also closed.

 

 
Appendix F: 2006 Recreational Catch Data

 

Figure 1:  2000 to 2006 South Coast Marine Creel Survey Chinook Catch Estimates by Month

 

Figure 2:  2006 Recreational Chinook Catch by Area

 

Figure 3:  2002 – 2006 Recreational Chinook Catch by Month for Strait of Georgia and Johnstone Strait (Areas 12 to 19, 28 and 29 and a portion of Area 20)*

*east of Sherringham Point

 

Figure 4:  2002 - 2006 Recreational Chinook Catch by Month for Juan de Fuca
(that portion of Area 20 west of Sherringham Point)


Figure 5:  2002 - 2006 Recreational Chinook Catch by Month for West Coast of Vancouver Island (23 to 27, 121 and 123 to 127)

 

Figure 6:  2002 – 2006 Recreational Chinook Catch by Month for the Fraser River from the Confluence with the Sumas River upstream to Hope, BC.

 

 


Preliminary 2006 Chinook Recreational Openings and Catch - Lower Fraser River Area

Table 1 below describes where and when recreational anglers were allowed to retain Chinook on the Fraser River in 2006.  Fishing was permitted during daylight hours only (from one hour after sunset to one hour before sunrise).  The daily limit was four Chinook per day of which only one could be an adult.  In the Lower Fraser River, an adult Chinook is defined as a Chinook over 50 cm in length except during the fall when the larger Harrison origin fish predominate.  From September 1 to December 31 in those waters downstream of the Agassiz-Rosedale Bridge, an adult Chinook is defined as being over 62 cm.  The Fraser River mainstem creel survey took place from May1st to October 9th, 2005 and covered the area from Sumas to Hope.

 

Table 1:  2006 Fraser River Chinook Recreational Openings.

Dates

Area

Daily Limit

May 01-Aug 31

Tidal waters of the Fraser River, and non-tidal waters of the Fraser River downstream from the confluence with Sawmill Creek.

4 per day, only one of which may be greater than 50 cm.

Sep 01-Dec 31

Tidal waters of the Fraser River and non-tidal waters of the Fraser River downstream from a line drawn between two triangular white boundary signs on either side of the Fraser River approximately 3 km upstream of the confluence with the Harrison River (Jesperson’s Bar)

4 per day, only one of which may be greater than 62 cm.

May 01-Aug 31

From Jesperson’s Bar line (described above) to Highway No. 1 Bridge at Hope BC

4 per day, only of which may be greater than 50 cm.

Sep 01-Sep 06

From Jesperson’s Bar line (described above) to Highway No. 1 Bridge at Hope BC

4 per day, only of which may be greater than 62 cm.

Oct 10-Dec 31

From Jesperson’s Bar line (described above) to Highway No. 1 Bridge at Hope BC

4 per day, only of which may be greater than 62 cm.

Sep 01-Sep 06

From Agassiz Rosedale Bridge to Highway No. 1 Bridge at Hope, BC

4 per day, only of which may be greater than 50 cm.

Oct 10-Dec 31

From Agassiz Rosedale Bridge to Highway No. 1 Bridge at Hope, BC

4 per day, only of which may be greater than 50 cm.

May 01-Sep 08

From the Highway No. 1 Bridge at Hope, BC upstream to the confluence with Sawmill Creek

4 per day, only of which may be greater than 50 cm.

Oct 13 to Dec 31

From the Highway No. 1 Bridge at Hope, BC upstream to the confluence with Sawmill Creek

4 per day, only of which may be greater than 50 cm.

 

Recreational catch data from the Fraser River Creel is provided in Table 2.

 

Recreational catch data from the Chilliwack River Creek is provided in Table 3.


Table 2. Fraser River recreational fishery assessment evaluation from May 1st to October 9th, 2006.  Total harvest and release (weekend and weekday data combined).  Sockeye estimates do not include August 1st and 2nd; sockeye opened on August 3rd.

 

 

 

May

June

July

August

September

September

October

Total

 

1-31

1-30

1-31

1-31

1-6

7-30

1-9

2006

 

chinook

chinook

chinook

sockeye

sockeye

chinook

chinook

 

Number of Interviews

158

556

2,741

4,702

804

917

357

10,235

Interview Hours

654

2,763

12,960

22,036

3,873

5,585

2,007

49,878

Number of Overflights

8

8

9

8

3

6

4

46

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANGLER EFFORT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Estimated Effort (hours)

4,046

31,792

143,265

460,566

72,417

18,950

16,022

747,058

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ESTIMATED HARVEST

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chinook Adult

44

1,121

4,491

7,701

828

230

21

14,436

Chinook Jack

0

0

20

486

182

19

0

707

Coho Adult

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Coho Jack

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Sockeye

0

0

0

117,468

16,824

0

0

134,292

Pink

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Chum

0

0

0

0

0

93

807

900

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ESTIMATED RELEASE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chinook Adult

0

31

71

147

27

74

49

399

Chinook Jack

0

0

0

148

0

3

0

151

Coho Adult

0

0

0

18

0

46

26

90

Coho Jack

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

2

Sockeye

0

30

5,374

13,117

2,850

2,241

31

23,643

Pink

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Chum

0

0

0

0

0

143

6943

7,086

 


In 2006, recreational anglers were permitted to retain Chinook on the Chilliwack River from Slesse Creek downstream to boundary signs near the confluence with the Fraser River from July 1 to December 31.  Fishing was permitted during daylight hours only (from one hour after sunset to one hour before sunrise).  The daily limit was four Chinook per day of which only one could exceed 62 cm in length.  A creel program was run from September 15th to November 15th, 2006 on the Chilliwack River.  Results from this creel are presented in the tables below.

 

Table 3:  Chilliwack River recreational fishery assessment final results from September 15 to November 15, 2006.  Total catch and release (weekend and weekday combined).

 

 

September

15-30

October

1-31

November

1-15

Total

Number of Interviews

971

3,293

601

4,865

Interview Hours

3,096

11,199

1,904

16,199

Number of Overflights

4

9

3

16

Average Overflight Count

188

559

151

299

 

 

 

 

 

ANGLER EFFORT

 

 

 

 

Estimated Effort (hours)

31,658

158,900

15,248

205,806

 

 

 

 

 

ESTIMATED HARVEST

 

 

 

 

Chinook Adult

862

7,051

320

8,233

Chinook Jack

267

577

27

871

Coho Adult

217

1,351

721

2,289

Coho Jack

16

88

15

119

Sockeye

0

0

0

0

Pink

0

0

0

0

Chum

226

4,836

313

5,375

 

 

 

 

 

ESTIMATED RELEASE

 

 

 

 

Chinook Adult

1,448

25,181

1,840

28,469

Chinook Jack

284

624

0

908

Coho Adult

164

3,082

1,988

5,234

Coho Jack

154

114

4

272

Sockeye

37

52

6

95

Pink

0

0

0

0

Chum

561

37,542

5,463

43,566

 

 


 

Preliminary 2006 Chinook Recreational Catches – Upper Fraser River (1)

 

System

Time/Duration

Hours Fished

Total Annual Catch

Bowron River

July 15 – Aug 15:

7days/week

N/A

No creel survey

Chilko River

July 25 - Aug 16:

7days/week

N/A

No creel survey

Fraser River at Prince George

 

 

Fraser River (confluence of Seton / Fraser River downstream to Seton powerhouse)

 

Jul 10 – Aug 25:

7days/week

 

July 1 - Sept. 7:

7days/week

 

 

N/A

 

 

N/A

 

 

 

 

No creel survey

 

 

No creel survey

 

 

 

 

Cariboo River

Jul 27 – Aug 18:

7days/week

 

N/A

No creel survey

Quesnel River

Jul 15 - Sept 1:

7days/week

 

N/A

No creel survey

Bridge River

June 21 – Jul 14:

5 days/week

(0600 - 2100 hrs)

 

675

63

Mabel Lake

noon July 25 to noon Sept 12:

7days/week

 

4725

301

North Thompson River (Clearwater River)

Aug 1 – Aug 31:

7 days/week

N/A

No Creel

Shuswap River (lower)

noon July 25 - noon Sept 12:

7days/week (0500 to 2200 hrs. daily)

14689

616

Shuswap River (middle)

noon July 25 - noon Aug 15:

7days/week

N/A

No Creel

South Thompson River

Aug 5 - Sept 22:

7days/week

N/A

No Creel

Thompson River (near Spences' Bridge)

Jul 22 - Aug 14:

Sat/Sun/Mon only

0600 - 2100 hrs.

2175

329

Thompson River (near Martel)

Aug 22 - Sept 3:

7 days/week

N/A

No Creel

 

(1) NoteDue to budget constraints in 2006 creel surveys were not undertaken in some recreational fisheries. Creel surveys were not undertaken in recreational fisheries where past years information suggested that catch and effort, and associated harvest rates, were very low.


Appendix G: Draft 2007 Chinook Recreational Fishing Plans

Table 1:  Freshwater Salmon Sport Fishing Regulations:  Region 2: Lower Mainland

 

1.      Unless otherwise stated in the table, the daily limit in all waters of Region 2 is zero (0).

2.      The aggregate daily limit for all species of Pacific salmon (other than kokanee) from tidal and non-tidal waters combined is four (4).

3.      All retained coho must measure 25 cm or more from tip of nose to tail fork, and all retained Chinook, chum, pink, and sockeye must measure 30 cm or more from tip of nose to tail fork.

4.      A single barbless hook is in effect year round for all streams in Region 2.

5.      There is an annual limit of 10 adult Chinook from all non-tidal waters.  All retained adult Chinook must be recorded immediately on the back of your Provincial Non-tidal Angling licence.  An "adult Chinook" in Region 2 is defined as being over 50 cm except in the following areas where an “adult Chinook” is defined as being over 62 cm: 

a)         the Fraser River between the CPR bridge at Mission to the powerline crossing approximately 1 km above the Aggasiz/Rosedale bridge from Sep 01 - Dec 31,

b)        the Chilliwack/Vedder River (including the Sumas River) the Capilano River and the Harrison River.

 

WATERS

SPECIFIC AREA

SPECIES

DATES

LIMITS / GEAR

Chehalis River

From the logging bridge 2.4 km below Chehalis Lake to the confluence of the Harrison/Chehalis Rivers, including tributaries to that part

All

Sep 01-Dec 31

Daylight hours only.

Chinook

Jan 01-May 31

No fishing for Chinook.

Jun 01-Aug 10

4 per day, only 1 over 50 cm.

Aug 11-Sep 15

No fishing for Chinook.

Sep 16-Dec 31

4 per day, only 1 over 62 cm.

Chilliwack/Vedder River (including Sumas River)

Downstream from Slesse Creek including that portion of the Sumas River from the Barrow Town Pump Station downstream to boundary signs near the confluence with the Fraser River

All

Sep 01-Dec 31

Daylight hours only.

Chinook

Jul 01-Dec 31

4 per day, only 1 over 62 cm.

Dewdney Slough - See Nicomen Slough

Fraser River

Salmon closures are being considered from early September to mid-October to protect co-migrating Upper Fraser and Thompson River coho.  Please contact your local DFO office for details.

From the downstream side of the CPR Bridge at Mission upstream to the Alexandria bridge, except Landstrom Bar (described below) which is closed to all angling from May 1 to Oct. 31.

All

Jul 01-Dec 31

Daylight hours only.

Chinook

May 1-Dec 31

4 per day, only 1 over 50 cm.

Landstrom Bar is those waters of the Fraser River inside a line beginning at a fishing boundary sign on the eastern end of Landstrom Bar, then to a fishing boundary sign on the opposite bank, then to a fishing boundary sign at the southern end of Croft Island, then westerly to a fishing boundary sign on the nearest bank of the river, then following the river bank to the beginning point.

Harrison River

From the Highway 7 bridge to the confluence with the Fraser River

All

Jul 01-Dec 31

Daylight hours only.

Chinook

Sep 01-Dec 31

4 per day, 1 over 50 cm

Pitt River

Upper and Lower, including tributaries

Chinook

Jan 01-Dec 31

No fishing for Chinook.

Stave River

Downstream of B.C. Hydro Dam to the CPR Railway Bridge

Chinook

Jan 01-Dec 31

1 per day.

Sumas River - See Chilliwack River

Vedder River - See Chilliwack River

 


Table 2:  Freshwater Salmon Sport Fishing Opportunities:  Region 3: Thompson-Nicola

 

1.      Unless otherwise stated in the table, the daily limit in all waters of Region 3 is zero (0).

2.      The aggregate daily limit for all species of Pacific salmon (other than kokanee) from tidal and non-tidal waters combined is four (4).

3.      A single barbless hook is in effect year round for all streams in Region 3.

4.      There is an annual limit of 10 adult Chinook from all non-tidal waters.  All retained Chinook must be recorded immediately on the back of your Provincial Non-tidal Angling licence.  An "adult Chinook" in Region 3 is defined as being over 50 cm.

 

WATERS

SPECIFIC AREA

SPECIES

DATES

LIMITS/GEAR

Bridge River

Downstream from Road 40 bridge to the confluence of the Fraser River (see also Fraser River opportunity).

Chinook

Jun 21- Jul 16 Sun, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thur only 06:00 to 21:00 hours daily.

4 per day, only 1 over 50cm.

Clearwater River

From Clearwater Lake downstream to the confluence of the North Thompson River (except CLOSED from Murtle River downstream to 35km post from Aug 16 - 31 to protect Mahood R. Chinook).

Chinook

Aug 1-Aug 31

4 per day, only 2 over 50cm.  Monthly quota is 4 over 50cm (includes adult Chinook caught and retained from North Thompson River).

Fraser River

Mainstem of the Fraser R. in Region 3 except for that portion of the Fraser R. described below

Chinook

Apr 1-Sep 17

4 per day, none over 50cm.

From the confluence of the Seton River and the Fraser River, downstream to the BC Hydro turbine generator tailrace located approximately 1 km downstream of the town of Lillooet.

Chinook

Jul 1-Sep 10

4 per day, only 1 over 50cm.

From the confluence with the Bridge River downstream to the BC Railway bridge, 2 km north of Lillooet (see also Bridge River opportunity).

Chinook

Jun 21-Jul 16 Sun, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thur only 0:600 to 21:00 hours daily.

4 per day, only 1 over 50cm.

Little Shuswap Lake - See South Thompson River

North Thompson River

Downstream of Station Road Bridge in Clearwater to the Ferry crossing at Little Fort.

Chinook

Aug 1-Aug 31

4 per day, only 2 over 50cm.  Monthly quota is 4 over 50cm (includes adult Chinook caught and retained from Clearwater River)

Mainstem river.

Chinook

Sep 1-Sep 22

4 per day none over 50 cm .

South Thompson River

From the green can buoy near outlet of Little River to 100m downstream of Campbell Creek.

Chinook

Aug 5-Sep 22

4 per day, only 2 over 50 cm. Monthly quotas are 6 over 50cm.

Thompson River

From Kamloops Lake downstream to the confluence with the Fraser River.

Chinook

Jun 1-Sep 21

4 per day, none over 50cm (retention of jack Chinook only) See exceptions below

From the upstream side of the mouth of the Nicola River downstream to the Hwy 8 bridge at Spences Bridge.

Chinook

July 21 to August 13.  Sat, Sun, Mon only, 06:00 to 21:00 hours only.

4 per day, only 1 over 50cm.  Environmental conditions in Nicola River may result in closure. Check with your local DFO office for updates.

From confluence with Bonaparte River to boundary sign approximately 1 km downstream. North Bank of the river only.

Chinook

To be determined in-season.

Opening dependent on number of Chinook returning to Bonaparte fish way by July 25.  Check with your local DFO office for updates.

From Hwy 8 bridge at Spences Bridge upstream to a fishing boundary sign located approximately 1 km downstream of Martel (west side of river only).  These waters open to fishing are subject to change.

Chinook

Aug 22-Sep 03

4 per day, only 1 over 50 cm.  Check with your local DFO office for updates.

 

 


Table 3:  Freshwater Salmon Sport Fishing Opportunities:  Region 5a: Cariboo

(Part A, Fraser River Watershed, Management Units 5-1 to 5-5 and 5-12 to 5-16)

 

1.      Unless otherwise stated in the table, the daily limit in all waters of Region 5 is zero (0).

2.      The aggregate daily limit for all species of Pacific salmon (other than kokanee) from tidal and non-tidal waters combined is four (4).

3.      All retained Chinook, must measure 30 cm or more from tip of nose to fork in tail (fork length).

4.      A single barbless hook is in effect year round for all streams in Region 5.

5.      There is an annual limit of 10 adult Chinook from all non-tidal waters.  All retained Chinook must be recorded immediately on the back of your Provincial Non-tidal Angling licence.  An "adult Chinook" in Region 5 is defined as being over 50 cm (fork length).

 

WATERS

SPECIFIC AREA

SPECIES

DATES

LIMITS / GEAR

Cariboo River

From confluence of the Quesnel River to the confluence of Seller Creek.

Chinook

Jul 27-Aug 18

4 per day, only 2 over 50cm.

Chilko River

From Chilko Lake downstream to boundary signs 1.5km upstream of Siwash bridge (12 km upstream from Chilcotin R. junction).

Chinook

Jul 25-Aug 16

4 per day, only 2 over 50cm.  Monthly limit of 4 over 50 cm.

Quesnel River

downstream of Poquette Creek

Chinook

Jul 15-Sep 1

4 per day, only 2 over 50cm.

 

 

Table 4:  Freshwater Salmon Sport Fishing Opportunities:  Region 7: Omineca-Peace

Shaded areas are new or changed opportunities.

 

1.      Unless otherwise stated in the table, the daily limit in all waters of Region 7 is zero (0).

2.      The aggregate daily limit for all species of Pacific salmon (other than kokanee) from tidal and non-tidal waters combined is four (4).

3.      All retained Chinook, must measure 30 cm or more from tip of nose to fork in tail (fork length).

4.      A single barbless hook is in effect year round for all streams in Region 7.

5.      There is an annual limit of 10 adult Chinook from all non-tidal waters.  All retained Chinook must be recorded immediately on the back of your Provincial Non-tidal Angling licence.  An "adult Chinook" in Region 7 is defined as being over 50 cm (fork length).

 

WATERS

SPECIFIC AREA

SPECIES

DATES

LIMITS / GEAR

Bowron River

From Forestry Road bridge nearest to the Fraser River, upstream to the Bowron Forest Road bridge crossing near Haggen Creek.

Chinook

Jul 10-Aug 15

4 per day, only 2 over 50cm. 

Fraser River

From power lines crossing the Fraser  River near College Hts, upstream to the Northwoods Bridge crossing the Fraser River

Chinook

Jul 10-Jul 25

4 per day, only 1 over 50cm.  

Upstream of the Northwoods Bridge to the Gas Pipline Crossing, near Shelley.

Chinook

Jul 10-Aug 15

4 per day, only 1 over 50cm

This is a proposed opening, consultation will occur prior to implementation.  Check with your local DFO office.


Table 5:  Freshwater Salmon Sport Fishing Opportunities:  Region 8: Okanagan

 

  1. Unless otherwise stated in the table, the daily limit in all waters of Region 8 is zero (0).

2.      The aggregate daily limit for all species of Pacific salmon (other than kokanee) from tidal and non-tidal waters combined is four (4).

3.      All retained Chinook, must measure 30 cm or more from tip of nose to fork in tail (fork length).

4.      A single barbless hook is in effect year round for all streams in Region 8.

5.      There is an annual limit of 10 adult Chinook from all non-tidal waters.  All retained Chinook must be recorded immediately on the back of your Provincial Non-tidal Angling licence.  An "adult Chinook" in Region 8 is defined as being over 50 cm (fork length).

 

WATERS

SPECIFIC AREA

SPECIES

DATES

LIMITS / GEAR

Mabel Lake

South of fishing boundary signs located on opposite shores approximately 1 km from Wap Creek.

Chinook

12:00 Jul 25-12:00 Sep 12

4 per day, only 2 over 50 cm.  Monthly quota is 4 over 50cm, including all Shuswap River and Mabel Lake Chinook. 

Shuswap River

Between Shuswap Falls and Mabel Lake.

Chinook

12:00 Jul 25 - 12:00 Aug 15

4 per day, only 2 over 50 cm.  Monthly quota is 4 over 50cm, including all Shuswap River and Mabel Lake Chinook. 

Upstream from signs above Mara Bridge to Mabel Lake.

Chinook

12:00 Jul 25 - 12:00 Sep 12 05:00-22:00 hours only

4 per day, only 2 over 50 cm.  Monthly quota is 4 over 50cm, including all Shuswap River and Mabel Lake Chinook. 

 

 

Tidal Waters

 

·                 The coast-wide daily limit for chinook is two.

·                 The total chinook annual limit is 30 from any tidal waters, of which at most,

o                10 may be caught in the tidal waters of the Fraser River;

o                15 may be caught in the waters of Areas 12 to 18, 28 and 29 and that portion of Area 19 north of Cadboro Point; and

o                20 may be caught in the waters of Area 20 and that portion of Area 19 south of Cadboro Point.

·                 Barbless hooks are required for all salmon fishing.

·                 The aggregate daily limit (total daily limit) for all species of Pacific salmon from tidal or non-tidal waters combined is four.

·                 The minimum size limit for Chinook in Areas 13 to 18, 28 and 29 and in that portion of Area 19 north of Cadboro Point is 62 cm.  The minimum size limit in all other waters is 45 cm.

·                 Substantial management measures are taken on Chinook fisheries on the West Coast of Vancouver Island and in the Strait of Georgia.  Maps showing details of these measures can be found online at:
http://www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/recfish

 


Appendix H: 2006 Commercial Catches and Summary of 2004 Area H Sampling Program

 

Figure 1:  Preliminary Estimates of 2006 Canadian Commercial Catch of Chinook Salmon by Gear Type and Salmon Licencing Area.

 

Note:  Area F Troll total includes 1,237 chinook taken in stock assessment fisheries.

 

Figure 2:  2006 Area F Troll Chinook Daily Catch and Effort.

 


Figure 3:  2006 Area F Troll Chinook Catch by Stock Group and Area.

 

Stock Group*

Area 1 catch

STD

Area 2W catch

STD

Total Catch

STD

Alaska

27

(57.6)

0

(0.4)

27

(57.6)

Alsek

25

(51.3)

1

(1.1)

26

(51.3)

Taku River

135

(166.9)

3

(3.1)

138

(167.0)

Stikine River

648

(376.9)

2

(2.5)

650

(376.9)

Yakoun River

1,020

(388.1)

0

(0.2)

1,020

(388.1)

Nass River

1,325

(466.4)

5

(2.5)

1,330

(466.4)

Skeena River and tributaries

4,539

(1034.5)

11

(4.2)

4,551

(1034.5)

Northern Mainland BC

5,152

(946.6)

10

(3.8)

5,162

(946.6)

West Coast Vancouver Island

6,393

(922.1)

72

(8.4)

6,465

(922.1)

East Coast Vancouver Island

2,369

(668.3)

18

(5.0)

2,388

(668.3)

Southern Mainland BC

115

(152.0)

1

(2.0)

117

(152.0)

Upper Fraser River

1,045

(418.1)

7

(2.9)

1,052

(418.1)

Middle Fraser River

3,532

(898.3)

10

(3.8)

3,541

(898.4)

North Thompson River

2,846

(736.8)

4

(2.5)

2,850

(736.8)

South Thompson River

62,707

(2294.9)

140

(11.1)

62,847

(2295.0)

Lower Thompson River

204

(147.2)

0

(0.5)

205

(147.2)

Lower Fraser River Spring

365

(253.1)

1

(1.0)

366

(253.1)

Lower Fraser River Summer

133

(131.4)

0

(0.3)

133

(131.4)

Lower Fraser River Fall

65

(120.4)

1

(1.5)

66

(120.4)

Puget Sound

923

(409.2)

3

(2.7)

927