2019 fisheries management measures to protect Fraser River chinook

Chinook salmon populations have been in decline for years as a result of a number of factors including habitat destruction, harvest, and the effects of climate change. Of the 13 wild Fraser River chinook salmon populations assessed, only one is not at risk. The science is clear. The loss of these chinook populations would be disastrous not just for wildlife that depend on them as a food source, but also for the many BC communities whose jobs and ways of life depend on chinook salmon. That’s why the Government of Canada has taken, and is taking, urgent and concrete actions to ensure that at-risk chinook salmon are protected for future generations.

Fisheries management measures for 2019 support the recovery of at risk Fraser River chinook populations and are aimed at protecting the communities and jobs that depend on chinook survival. These measures were developed following consultation with Indigenous communities, recreational and commercial fishing organizations and environmental organizations. These measures are one component of a larger strategy intended to place at risk Pacific salmon populations on a path towards sustainability.

Fisheries management measures for the 2019 fishing season include:

These new measures are difficult, but they are necessary to address Fraser River chinook declines. A continued decline would irrevocably harm species that depend on the survival of chinook salmon, such as the Southern Resident killer whale. In addition, it would permanently affect the culture, heritage and livelihoods of Indigenous communities and permanently eliminate many jobs in the recreational and commercial fishing industries.

Maps of chinook management measures

WCVI Offshore, Johnstone Strait, Strait of Georgia and Juan de Fuca

Map of management actions for West Coast Vancouver Island Offshore, Johnstone Strait, Strait of Georgia and Juan de Fuca

Map of management actions for West Coast Vancouver Island Offshore, Johnstone Strait, Strait of Georgia and Juan de Fuca

WCVI Subareas 20-1 and 20-2, and offshore Area 121, as well as Areas 123 to 127 seaward of a 1 nm Boundary Line

Please see FN0395 for full definition of the Boundary Line.

  • Apr. 1 to Jul. 14, chinook non-retention;
  • July 15 to July 31, 2 chinook per day with a maximum size of 80 cm.
  • Aug. 1 to Dec. 31, 2 chinook per day

Queen Charlotte Strait and Johnstone Strait in Area 12 (excluding Subarea 12-14) and Strait of Georgia – North (Areas 13 to 17, 28, portions of 29 (29-1 and 29-2)

  • Apr. 1 to Jul. 14, chinook non-retention
  • July 15 to July 31, 1 chinook per day with a maximum size of 80 cm.
  • Aug. 1 to Aug. 29, 1 chinook per day
  • Aug. 30 to Dec. 31, 2 chinook per day

Strait of Georgia – South and Juan de Fuca Strait Area 18, Subareas 19-3 to 19-12, Subareas 29-3 to 29-5, 29-8 and Subareas 20-3 to 20-7

  • Apr. 1 to Jul. 31, chinook non-retention
  • Aug. 1 to Aug. 29, 1 chinook per day (with option for terminal fisheries)
  • Aug. 30 to Dec. 31, 2 chinook per day
Area 29 Fraser River tidal and non-tidal

Map of management actions for Area 29 Fraser River tidal and non-tidal

Map of management actions for Area 29 Fraser River tidal and non-tidal

Fraser River tidal waters and non-tidal waters

This includes Subareas 29-6 to 29-17 and the non-tidal waters of the Fraser River from the Mission Bridge to the confluence with Sawmill Creek.

  • Jan. 1 to Aug. 23, No fishing for salmon
  • Aug. 23 to Dec. 31, Chinook non-retention. Fisheries for other species may take place depending on in-season information and management measures that may be required for other stocks of concern such as steelhead and coho salmon.
Southern BC Food, Social and Ceremonial fisheries

Map for Southern BC Food, Social and Ceremonial fisheries

Map for Southern BC Food, Social and Ceremonial fisheries

Southern BC Food, Social and Ceremonial fisheries

  • Lower Fraser and BC Interior: chinook non-retention to July 14th; very limited priority access for ceremonial purposes will be considered prior to July 14th. To ensure the maximum possible number of Chinook salmon that have managed to pass through the Big Bar landslide barrier successfully reach their spawning grounds, we will be working with First Nations in these areas to minimize Chinook harvests above the slide site.
  • In Southern BC marine waters beginning 00:01 hours April 19 until 23:59 hours July 14, 2019 chinook non-retention will be in effect in the following Areas and Subareas:
    • Areas 12 to 21, 121 Subareas 29-1 to 29-7,29-9, 29-10 and those portions of Areas 123 to 127 1 nautical mile seaward of the surfline.
  • For clarity, chinook retention is permitted in Areas 11, 23 to 27, 111 and those portions of Areas 123 to 127 shoreward of a Boundary Line 1 nautical mile seaward of the surfline.

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